baseball

New technology meets America’s pastime in sports photographer Brad Mangin’s new book: Instant Baseball: The Baseball Instagrams of Brad Mangin. As he tells Mark Heyne, he spent the entire 2012 baseball season, from spring training through the World Series, photographing the game and the players with Instagram on his iPhone4s, not his usual Canon cameras.

This one-hour special shares memories of the women whose husbands were affiliated with the Cincinnati Reds during the 1950’s. These wives include Jo McMillan, Eleanor Kluszewski, Joyce Bell-Dolle, Priscilla Stowe, and Betty Hoyt. Jo McMillan talks about driving with her kids around the country to watch her husband Roy McMillan play ball. You’ll also hear memories of Crosley Field and what life was like for baseball families outside the ballpark. Hosted by Howard Wilkinson and produced by Lee Hay.

Sarah Ramsey

It's Opening Day in Cincinnati and it might as well be a major holiday in this baseball-crazed town.

Despite the cold, thousands of fans turned out to line the parade route, party at The Banks, and get into the ballpark early to watch batting practice.

Along Race Street Brandy Adams and her friend were seated hours before the parade began and it turns out, they sit in the same place every year to watch it.

"I don't know, it just kind of happens. We always park in the same spot, it was never done on purpose."

Rhodes-Klumpe Collection/Reds Hall of Fame

Somewhere in Great American Ball Park today, there will be many a little boy or little girl, dressed in red from head to toe, bundled up in Reds blanket, watching in awe at his or her first Opening Day.
 

Seeing their heroes play on the green grass – Joey Votto, Brandon Phillips, Jay Bruce and the rest.
 

They will be sitting next to a mother or father, who had their own childhood heroes – the wire-to-wire, World Series champion Reds – thinking of their own childhood heroes – Barry Larkin, Eric Davis, Chris Sabo.

MLB

Baseball fans expect a lot from their electronic devices both at the Major League and youth level. How is it possible to get nearly real-time information every game for things like landing speed and the nastiness of the pitch? Even coaches of kids teams are using software to keep parents and grandparents up to date remotely. Ann Thompson reports in "Focus on Technology," on how programs like Gameday and iScorecast work.


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