Barack Obama

Four years ago, politicos on both sides were stunned when the formerly rock-solid Hamilton County was won by Barack Obama by a margin of 29,683 votes, taking 54 percent of the county to 46 percent for GOP nominee John McCain.

This year, the GOP and the Romney-Ryan campaign rolled the dice on winning back Hamilton County, one of the handful of linchpin counties that can make or break a presidential campaign in Ohio.

Again, though, they lost.

The race between President Obama and GOP nominee Mitt Romney in the key battleground state of Ohio is a toss-up, according to the final Ohio Poll released Monday morning by the University of Cincinnati's Institute for Policy Research.

The poll had support for Obama at 50 percent, while Romney's support stood at 48.5 percent. Another 1.5 percent of those polled said they would vote for another candidate.

Electing Mitt Romney would be a return to policies that have failed in the past and “crashed our economy,’’ President Obama told a full house crowd of 13,500 at the University of Cincinnati’s Fifth Third Arena Sunday night.

The highly charged-up crowd, that was entertained before and after the president’s speech by legendary recording artist Stevie Wonder, roared its approval when Obama appealed to them to help him win the election that takes place on Tuesday and appears now to be too close to call.

Here we go again.


We’ve seen this movie before.
 

Eight years ago on election night, President George W. Bush was sweating it out in the White House, watching states turn red or blue in what was obviously to be a close race with Democrat John Kerry.


Ohio’s returns kept going back and forth – Kerry in the lead, then Bush, then Kerry again.
The Bush team was sweating bullets. It was going to come down to Ohio.


Finally, late into the night – Ohio was called for Bush.

The Obama-Biden campaign is sending seven-time Grammy winner will.i.am and actress-producer Vivica A. Fox to Cincinnati Saturday for a "Party at the Polls" event outside the Hamilton County Board of Elections.

"Party at the Polls" begins at 10 a.m. outside the board of elections at 824 Broadway downtown.

The board offices will be open from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday for early voters, as well as from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. on Sunday and 8 a.m. until 2 p.m. on Monday.

Four years ago, then-senator Barack Obama held a rally at the University of Cincinnati on the Sunday before the election, his final stop in Cincinnati before going on to win Ohio and the White House two days later.

This year, Obama - now locked in a tight re-election campaign where Ohio will play a crucial role - will return to the same Sunday for a rally at UC's Fifth Third Arena in what is likely to be his final campaign appearance in the area before Tuesday's election.

President Obama - who had originally planned to be in Cincinnati Wednesday - will hold a campaign event here Sunday as part of a weekend push through key battleground states.

And First Lady Michelle Obama is planning on a rally Saturday afternoon on the campus of Miami University in Oxford, the alma mater of GOP running mate Paul Ryan.

President Obama holds a two percentage point lead over Republican Mitt Romney in the Ohio Poll released Wednesday afternoon by the University of Cincinnati's Institute for Policy Research.

That is well within the poll's margin of error of plus or minus 2.9 percent, meaning the race in Ohio is extremely close and the end result is a toss-up.

The poll had Obama with 48 percent support to 46 percent for Romney.

President Obama, who suspended personal campaigning this week while he dealt with the aftermath of the storm that devastated large parts of the east coast, will return to the campaign trail Friday in the key battleground state of Ohio, where the polls show him in a dead heat with Mitt Romney.

There is no official word yet from the Obama-Biden campaign on re-scheduling the president's rally that was scheduled for this morning at Duke Energy Convention Center in Cincinnati. That was canceled by the White House Tuesday, but could well be re-scheduled.

The White House just announced that President Obama will remain in Washington, D.C., Wednesday to monitor damage from Hurricane Sandy, causing the cancelation of a planned campaign rally with the president at Duke Energy Convention Center in Cincinnati.

The president had been scheduled to rally supporters at the convention center Wednesday morning. He was also scheduled to do a rally later in the day in Akron. That too has been canceled.

President Obama's Wednesday rally in Cincinnati will be at the Duke Energy Convention Center downtown, with the doors opening at 8 a.m., according to the Obama-Biden campaign.

Tickets for the event are available at https://mybarackobama.com/page/s/obama-cincinnati-oct-31.  Tickets are also available on Sunday from 5 to 9 p.m. at the Duke Energy Convention Center, 525 Elm St., downtown or at the Organizing for America office at 1240 W. Kemper Rd. in Forest Park.

President Obama's Wednesday rally in Cincinnati will be at the Duke Energy Convention Center downtown, with the doors opening at 8 a.m., according to the Obama-Biden campaign.

Tickets for the event are available at https://mybarackobama.com/page/s/obama-cincinnati-oct-31.  Tickets are also available on Sunday from 5 to 9 p.m. at the Duke Energy Convention Center, 525 Elm St., downtown or at the Organizing for America office at 1240 W. Kemper Rd. in Forest Park.

Ohio is the birthplace of aviation, but automobiles are driving this presidential election in the Buckeye State.


Specifically, the 2009 move by the federal government to save General Motors and Chrysler from going down the drain. The auto industry “bailout,” as the Romney campaign likes to call it. The Obama campaign prefers the term “rescue.”


There is really no way to adequately describe how critical Ohio is to the question Americans will decide in nine days – who will occupy the Oval Office at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue for the next four years.

President Obama will be back in Cincinnati Wednesday for what the campaign is describing as a "grassroots event."

His opponent, Mitt Romney, was in Cincinnati Thursday; and the president's return to the Buckeye State - and particularly heavily-contested Hamilton County - are indications of how Ohio and its 18 electoral votes are crucial to both candidates.

No details have been released on the Cincinnati visit, but it will be followed later in the day by a campaign event in Akron. Obama appeared at a rally of supporters in Cleveland Thursday.

Both the Obama-Biden and Romney-Ryan campaigns are holding watch parties tonight for the presidential candidates' third and final debate.

Former Bengal linebacker Anthony Munoz, a member of the Pro Football Hall of Fame, will be the featured guest at a Romney-Ryan watch party at the original Montgomery Inn, 9440 Montgomery Road, Montgomery. It begns at 8 p.m.

Martin O'Malley, Maryland's Democratic governor, and Cincinnati Mayor Mark Mallory will join local Obama supporters for a watch party at 8:30 p.m. at Cincy's on Sixth, 41 E. 6th St., downtown.

Pages