abortion

A Cincinnati anti-abortion activist was in regular contact with Republican Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine's office during a 2015 Planned Parenthood investigation and some of her input was shared with state investigators, according to emails obtained by The Associated Press.

A new bill has been introduced that would require health classes cover fetal development and offer students information on where they can find prenatal care. But it doesn’t include other related information.

A federal appeals court on Wednesday blocked an Ohio law that tried to divert public money from Planned Parenthood in an anti-abortion push by GOP lawmakers.

kentucky state capitol building
Peter Fitzgerald / Wikimedia

This year’s Kentucky General Assembly was book-ended by turmoil, but over the course of nearly four months the Republican-led legislature was still able to wrangle the votes to approve politically volatile policies like changing pension benefits for public workers and overhauling Kentucky’s tax code amid intense protests from public workers, especially teachers.

A newly introduced bill in the Ohio Legislature that would outlaw abortion entirely is getting a lot of attention on social media and around water coolers. But will it get serious consideration from lawmakers, especially considering some abortion bills that haven’t gone as far have not passed? 

Last week, Judge Timothy Black of the U.S. District Court’s Southern District of Ohio granted a preliminary injunction against Ohio’s newest abortion law. It banned abortion at the point in which Down Syndrome could be detected in fetal tests. Within hours of Black's ruling, Attorney General Mike DeWine appealed the decision. Since Gov. John Kasich and the Republican dominated legislature took control almost eight years ago, twenty abortion laws have been passed and many of those have sparked litigation. What has the state spent to defend those new laws in court?

Holly Yurchison / WVXU

Ohio Gov. John Kasich has signed one abortion ban, but vetoed another.

The controversial bill that would ban abortion after the first detectable fetal heartbeat passed the Ohio House, largely on a party line vote. Statehouse correspondent Karen Kasler reports the emotion was no surprise, but one revelation was.

Activists offer stats and stories of effect of Ohio abortion laws

Mar 11, 2015

During the past four years, Ohio lawmakers have passed several laws restricting abortion in Ohio. But the questions about the effect those laws are having on women in the Buckeye State depends on who you ask.

If you talk to opponents of Ohio’s new restrictions on abortion, they’ll tell you those laws are forcing Ohio’s women into going out of state for abortions and care for difficult pregnancies.

Jo Ingles/Ohio Public Radio

Some new bills at the Statehouse would make abortion illegal at earlier stages of pregnancy than the existing law, which bans abortion after around 24 weeks.

And one would also take more money away from Planned Parenthood.

Ohio Right to Life is backing six bills that the group says would reduce the number of abortions in Ohio.  One of those is legislation that would make abortion illegal at 20 weeks into a pregnancy. Republican Representative Kristina Roegner will sponsor that bill in the Ohio House.

U.S. District Court Judge Michael Barrett will take over a Planned Parenthood lawsuit against the Ohio Department of Health after Judge Timothy Black removed himself from the case.

Black, an appointee of President Obama, was director of Planned Parenthood of Cincinnati from 1986 to 1989; and served as its president in 1988.

Right to Life of Greater Cincinnati objected to Black hearing the case, saying Black’s past involvement with Planned Parenthood was a conflict of interest.

By an eight-to-one margin, Ohio voters support the use of medical marijuana, while support for same sex marriage has reached 50 percent, according to a Quinnipiac University poll released this morning.

The poll by the Connecticut-based polling institute, which regularly polls voters in key states, said that 51 percent of Ohio voters said adults should be allowed to possess small amounts of marijuana for personal use, while 44 percent were opposed.