The controversial bill that would ban abortion after the first detectable fetal heartbeat passed the Ohio House, largely on a party line vote. Statehouse correspondent Karen Kasler reports the emotion was no surprise, but one revelation was.

Activists offer stats and stories of effect of Ohio abortion laws

Mar 11, 2015

During the past four years, Ohio lawmakers have passed several laws restricting abortion in Ohio. But the questions about the effect those laws are having on women in the Buckeye State depends on who you ask.

If you talk to opponents of Ohio’s new restrictions on abortion, they’ll tell you those laws are forcing Ohio’s women into going out of state for abortions and care for difficult pregnancies.

Jo Ingles/Ohio Public Radio

Some new bills at the Statehouse would make abortion illegal at earlier stages of pregnancy than the existing law, which bans abortion after around 24 weeks.

And one would also take more money away from Planned Parenthood.

Ohio Right to Life is backing six bills that the group says would reduce the number of abortions in Ohio.  One of those is legislation that would make abortion illegal at 20 weeks into a pregnancy. Republican Representative Kristina Roegner will sponsor that bill in the Ohio House.

U.S. District Court Judge Michael Barrett will take over a Planned Parenthood lawsuit against the Ohio Department of Health after Judge Timothy Black removed himself from the case.

Black, an appointee of President Obama, was director of Planned Parenthood of Cincinnati from 1986 to 1989; and served as its president in 1988.

Right to Life of Greater Cincinnati objected to Black hearing the case, saying Black’s past involvement with Planned Parenthood was a conflict of interest.

By an eight-to-one margin, Ohio voters support the use of medical marijuana, while support for same sex marriage has reached 50 percent, according to a Quinnipiac University poll released this morning.

The poll by the Connecticut-based polling institute, which regularly polls voters in key states, said that 51 percent of Ohio voters said adults should be allowed to possess small amounts of marijuana for personal use, while 44 percent were opposed.