2018 Ohio governor's race

So, Ohio Lt. Gov. Mary Taylor – who wants to be the next governor – is running away from Gov. John Kasich at the speed of light.

And the apparent front-runner for the GOP gubernatorial nomination, Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine hasn't gone out of his way to court the support of the present governor.

Kasich, for his part, responds to all of this with his usual reaction to such things – he shrugs his shoulders, moves on, and books another trip to New Hampshire for April, making it abundantly clear that, one way or another, he plans on running for president again in 2020.

Tana Weingartner

Republican gubernatorial candidate Mary Taylor has reached beyond the stable of professional politicians to choose Nathan Estruth, a Cincinnati-area businessman and social activist as her running mate.

We're not here to say that the pairing of U.S. Rep. Jim Renacci and Cincinnati council member Amy Murray is not going to work.  

Howard Wilkinson / WVXU

Updated 1 p.m.

Republican Cincinnati council member Amy Murray is teaming up with gubernatorial candidate Jim Renacci as his running mate.


WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with News Director Maryanne Zeleznik Monday about Ohio Supreme Court Justice Bill O'Neill and his declared candidacy for Ohio governor. Can O'Neill continue to sit on the bench and be a partisan political candidate? Many are saying no, but O'Neill, the only Democrat on the court, says he won't resign until Jan. 26. 

Until recently former Ohio attorney general Richard Cordray had been stuck in political limbo for what seemed like an eternity, unable, by federal law, to even hint at his ambition to be Ohio's next governor.

The Grove City Democrat was serving as the first director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB), with a six-year term that was to have expired in June 2018.

The Hatch Act, which prohibits most federal employees from engaging in partisan politics, kept Cordray quiet about his ambitions, even though everyone in Ohio knew he had them burning inside him.


Four Democratic candidates for Ohio governor largely avoided criticizing one another in Monday night’s City Club of Cleveland debate, focusing their condemnation instead on Republican state leadership.

Ohioans elect a new governor in 2018. The four official Democratic candidates vying to become Ohio's next governor are participating in a live debate from Cleveland.

The following candidates are participating in this hour-long debate: Connie Pillich, Joe Schiavoni, Betty Sutton, Nan Whaley. The debate is moderated by Karen Kasler, bureau chief, Ohio Public Radio Television Statehouse News Bureau and Russ Mitchell, anchor WKYC Channel 3 News.


WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson spoke with News Director Maryanne Zeleznik Monday morning about all the news generated by Ohio Democrats last week: Former Ohio Attorney General Rich Cordray announcing he will quit his federal job, presumably to run for Ohio governor; and a bizarre Facebook post from Ohio Supreme Court Justice Bill O'Neill in which he detailed his sex life, creating a firestorm of criticism from fellow Democrats. 

It was becoming something like a Samuel Beckett play: Waiting for Cordray.

Nearly a year of waiting for Richard Cordray, the former state treasurer and Ohio attorney general, to make up his mind to leave as the first and only director the federal Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB), ended Wednesday when Cordray sent a letter to his staff saying he would leave office by the end of the month.

The Jerry Springer show continues.

No, not the syndicated slime-fest of a TV show that is now in its 27th season, dealing with important topics such as Mark, The Guy Who Married A Horse; David, The Kung Fu Hillbilly; Heidi, The Adult Baby; and many more far too salacious to name here.

As Springer himself says, when he is out and about and talking politics, "my show is stupid."

We've sort of become accustomed to candidates meeting in debates and spending as much time ripping into each other as they do talking about their own ideas.

This was not the case last Tuesday night, when the four Democrats running for Ohio governor met on a high school auditorium stage last Tuesday night in Martins Ferry, an Ohio River town in Belmont County.


WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with News Director Maryanne Zeleznik Monday about the debate among the four announced Democratic candidates for Ohio governor Tuesday night; and how the possible entry of Richard Cordray and/or Jerry Springer might upset the apple cart. 

There is hardly a significant campaign for high office that goes by without a fight over debates.

Will we have them? How many will have? Where will they be? What will the ground rules be?

And, in some cases, those questions never get answered – usually because of the intransigence of one candidate or another – and no debate ever happens.

But the 2018 gubernatorial race in Ohio will most certainly have debates.

In fact, there is one already scheduled.


WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with Tana Weingartner Monday about the Republicans' fundraising advantage over the Democrats in the 2018 gubernatorial race; and whether or not the field on both sides will shrink before the end of the year.