2016 presidential election

For a period of time even longer than the Chicago Cubs' 108-year drought between World Series championships, Ohio has been the bellwether of this country's presidential politics.

When Ohio went for Donald Trump on Nov. 8 it marked the 29th time in the past 31 presidential elections that Ohio went with the winner, a record unmatched by any other state in that period of time.

That's the mark of a bellwether state.

But it's not the only mark.

Naturally, Democrats in Hamilton County were as shocked and disbelieving as Democrats anywhere else Tuesday night when Donald Trump won the White House, even though nearly all the indicators leading up to the election pointed to a Hillary Clinton victory.

It will take them some time to get over that; and some considerable time to figure out how they can fight back, as members of a party that doesn’t control either the executive or legislative branches of government – and are looking warily at what might happen to the judicial branch.

It's a tough pill to swallow.

Ann Thompson / WVXU

Butler County Board of Elections Deputy Director Jocelyn Bucaro was direct and to the point when hosting an 11:30 a.m. conference call with reporters Tuesday about how the election was going halfway through the day .

"It's going smoothly," Bucaro said. She said long lines had cleared out from the morning and midday voters were able to get in and out quickly. The busiest polling places were in Lakota, Monroe, parts of Fairfield and Middletown.

Jay Hanselman / WVXU

Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders is asking his supporters and other Democrats to spend the next several days working to make sure Republican Donald Trump is not the next president.  

The former Democratic candidate is now supporting Hillary Clinton.  

Provided

Though most political pundits say Donald Trump's chances to win 270 electoral votes, and the White House, are unlikely, latest polling shows the race is now a virtual tie between Trump and Hillary Clinton. 

WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with news director Maryanne Zeleznik this morning about how both presidential campaigns - particularly the Hillary Clinton campaign - are focusing their efforts on convincing supporters to vote early. And there was a discussion of how voting percentages drop off dramatically in down-ticket races in presidential years.

Here's something that Hamilton County Democratic Party chairman Tim Burke and his counterpart in the Hamilton County Republican Party, Alex Triantafilou, have in common, nine days before the election.

Neither one of them has even a vague notion of which presidential candidate – Democrat Hillary Clinton or Republican Donald Trump – is going to win Hamilton County, a swing county in a swing state.

WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with News Director Maryanne Zeleznik Monday morning about Donald Trump's claims that the election is "rigged' and how Ohio Secretary of State Jon Husted is answering Trump. Also, Wilkinson, a serious baseball fan, says he's rooting for the Cleveland Indians in the World Series. 

It's become clear that most Republican Party leaders at all levels, local and national, are really, really tired of hearing Donald Trump going on about this election being rigged.

This election which, in fact, hasn't happened yet.

Both Friday and Monday, Morning Edition Host Steve Inskeep broadcast from the WVXU studios as he talked with Ohio voters about the presidential election.  Maryanne Zeleznik had a chance to sit down with him to talk about what it's been like covering this particular election:

 

WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with news director Maryanne Zeleznik this morning about the impact Donald Trump's lewd and vulgar remarks about women in 2005 is already damaging his campaign in Ohio. 

Howard Wilkinson / WVXU

Ohio's junior U.S. senator, Rob Portman announced late Saturday he is rescinding his previous endorsement of Republican president nominee Donald Trump.

Portman was one of dozens of GOP leaders from around the country who have announced they can no longer support Trump, after the disclosure Friday of a 2005 video in which Trump makes lewd, vulgar comments about a married woman he said he wanted to have sex with.

Poor old Ohio. Once the bellwether of the nation; once the ultimate swing state in presidential elections.

Now, if you pay attention to some recent national news reports, Ohio is watching its bellwether status slip away. It is becoming the Rodney Dangerfield of American Politics, shifting its necktie and whining that it gets no respect.

cliparthut.com

 

On October 1, 1920, the executive committee of the League of Women Voters of Cincinnati held its first meeting. 

Pete Rightmire/WVXU

 

Monday night's match-up between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump was the most-watched presidential debate in history, with more than 84 million viewers. 

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