2016 presidential election

WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with news director Maryanne Zeleznik Monday about Monday night's Iowa presidential caucuses. Who might come away as winners? And does it really matter in the quest for the White House? 

  From afar, the Iowa caucuses look like a chaotic state fair midway, with candidates playing bumper cars as they careen around the state in search of voters for Monday’s first-in-the-nation caucus.

Yes, it chaos – controlled chaos, but chaos nonetheless.

But when you are there on the ground, watching it up close, as 19 Xavier University students were last weekend, it is a whirlwind, but one that makes sense.

And, as the Xavier students found, one that the people of Iowa revel in every four years.

WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with news director Maryanne Zeleznik Monday morning about the role Ohio and Kentucky are likely to play in the selection of Democratic and Republican presidential nominees.

U.S. Senate/U.S. State Department

Ohio Democrats will gather in all 16 of the state’s congressional districts Tuesday night to select delegate and alternate slates for Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders in Ohio’s March 15 primary election.

Ohio Republicans don’t use the caucus system to select delegates at the congressional district level – the campaigns of all 11 GOP candidates who have qualified for the March primary ballot have already been named by their campaigns and filed with the Ohio Secretary of State’s office.

  WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with news director Maryanne Zeleznik Monday morning about what kind of field of candidates Ohio voters may face when they go to the polls March 15 for the Ohio presidential primary. 

Provided, Ken Rudin

The attacks in Paris last Friday placed national security and the continued threat from the Islamic State and other terrorist groups at the forefront of political discussions this week.

Political outsiders Donald Trump and Ben Carson continue to lead the Republican field of candidates by wide margins, Hillary is polling far ahead of Bernie Sanders, though his numbers actually went up after the first Democratic debate. And now neither has to worry about Vice President Joe Biden jumping into the race.

WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with Maryanne Zeleznik Monday morning about the sinking poll numbers in Ohio Gov. John Kasich's Republican presidential bid; and what's in store Tuesday night at the first Democratic presidential debate. 

  Last Monday, at the beginning of what turned out to be a not-so-hot week for Ohio’s governor, John Kasich, he said something at the opening of his New Hampshire presidential campaign headquarters that was very revealing; and very frank.

“We’ve got about 128 days to go until the New Hampshire primary,’’ the Boston Globe reported Kasich as saying. “We do well here; we’re moving on. We do terrible here; it’s over. No confusion about that. This is very, very important to us.”

Howard Wilkinson

Rand Paul, Kentucky’s junior senator, didn’t bring up the subject of his campaign for the Republican presidential nomination when he spoke to the Florence Rotary Club Monday, but he had plenty to say about it to reporters afterwards.

Paul, who is mired in the single digits in national polls, took a back-handed swipe at the Republican candidate who is leading most national polls, business mogul Donald Trump – and he did it without mentioning him by name.

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