2016 presidential election

Department of State

Hillary Clinton will campaign in Cincinnati Monday with someone who could become her running mate, Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warner.

The Clinton Campaign says the Ohio Democratic Party event will take place at the Cincinnati Museum Center at 10:30 AM. Doors open at 8:30 AM.

Members of the public interested in attending this event should RSVP here: http://hrc.io/28Ndfg3.

 The race between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump is a dead heat at this point in the crucial swing state of Ohio, according to a Quinnipiac University poll released Tuesday morning.

But the poll – which had Clinton and Trump in a flat-footed tie at 40 percent each – may be a slight improvement for the Democratic candidate, who trailed Trump by four percentage points in a Quinnipiac poll released in May.

The poll showed that women voters are moving to Clinton in greater numbers. Clinton's support among women is at 48 percent now, compared to 43 percent in May.

  Thursday night, Bernie Sanders looked into a TV camera and spoke for 23 minutes to approximately 220,000 of his most fervent supporters via a live-stream feed.

The Vermont senator, who rallied millions of voters to his cause during the primary and caucus season, said many things during his 23 minutes.

Except the one thing that Hillary Clinton and her supporters were hoping to hear:

I will vote for Hillary Clinton for president of the United States and I urge all of my supporters to do the same.

There can be no denying the historic nature of the moment in late July when Hillary Clinton steps to the podium at the Wells Fargo Center in Philadelphia to become the first woman nominated by a major party as its presidential candidate.

"I'm grateful that it is happening in my lifetime,'' said Kathy Helmbock, a Clinton supporter and a long-time activist in feminist organizations such as the National Organization for Women and the Cincinnati Women's Political Caucus.

Pete Rightmire/WVXU

    

Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton won Washington State's primaries Tuesday. It looks all but certain the two will face-off in November. But Bernie Sanders has vowed to stay in the race until the convention.

WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with News Director Maryanne Zeleznik Monday morning about how a race between Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton might play out in the critical swing state of Ohio this fall.

Donald Trump is going to be the Republican nominee for president. Anyone with an elementary grasp of mathematics has known that for some time now.

The once-gargantuan field of GOP presidential candidates dwindled in recent weeks to three – Trump, Ted Cruz and John Kasich. And, after Trump's thumping of Cruz Tuesday in Indiana, it was finally down to one, with first Cruz and then Kasich falling on their swords and crying "uncle."

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Soon after Tuesday's Indiana primaries, both Ted Cruz and John Kasich suspended their campaigns, leaving Donald Trump the apparent GOP nominee. And even though Bernie Sanders pulled out a narrow win over Hillary Clinton, it is all but certain she will be the Democratic nominee. So at this point it looks as if the candidates who will run in the general election are two people who, according to recent polls, most Americans just do not like all that much. And members of both parties are left asking, "Now what?" 

For local political party leaders, the trouble with presidential election years is that they don't happen in a vacuum.

While there is no more important decision voters will make on Nov. 8 than who will be the 45th President of the United States, a county party chairman has to worry about all the down-ticket races as well – the county commissioners, the county office-holders, the local judgeships.

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We're in the middle of a full week without a primary, but that doesn't mean there has been a lull in the race to the White House. The candidates and their campaigns are keeping things interesting, if not all that presidential.

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