2016 presidential election

ohioswallow.com

Since the 19th century, the only Democrats to lose Ohio yet win the presidency were John F. Kennedy and Franklin D. Roosevelt. And no Republican has ever lost the state and won the White House. 

There is a reason Ohio is called the bellwether of American presidential politics – a reason why it is watched so closely by the political professionals and the pundits every year.

Ohio is a microcosm of America, except in a few demographic categories, such as the percentage of Hispanic population – 17 percent nationwide, only 3.3 percent in Ohio.

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Given just how unusual this presidential campaign has been, political pundits have found it difficult to accurately predict what is going to happen next. 

WVXU/Pete Rightmire

  

The first of three presidential candidate debates is just more than three weeks away. 

Ann Thompson / WVXU

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton, in a room full of thousands of men and women who have served in the nation's military, said her opponent wants to destroy the alliances "that generations of Americans in uniform have fought and died to create those bonds."

WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with Tana Weingartner Monday morning about polling in the presidential race, both in the key swing state of Ohio and nationally; and how Trump's campaign has gotten under the skin of of many GOP leaders, who want him to tone down his rhetoric.

 Let's imagine for a moment that you are Donald Trump, right now, today.

Alright, that may be an extraordinarily difficult task for many of you, but let's use our imaginations.

So you, Donald Trump, are coming out of what has been a very bad week.

With the Democratic National Convention only a week in the rear view mirror, this is the time when you, as the Republican nominee for president, need to be honing your message against your opponent, Hillary Clinton, and going on the offense  against her on a raft of potential issues.

WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson spoke with news director Maryanne Zeleznik Monday morning about growing calls for Hillary Clinton to consider former Ohio attorney general and state treasurer Richard Cordray as her running mate. It's a long shot, but Cordray is likely to get consideration. 

Suddenly, there is a major buzz going on – and not just in the Buckeye State – about an Ohioan possibly joining Hillary Clinton on the Democratic ticket as the vice presidential candidate.

You may well have read the above paragraph and assumed we were talking about the senior senator from Ohio, Sherrod Brown, who has been the subject of much veepship speculation.

Well, we're not talking about Sherrod Brown.

Tana Weingartner / WVXU

SHARONVILLE - If there are Republicans who were waiting for a toned-down Donald Trump, reading carefully written speeches from a teleprompter, he didn't show up here Wednesday night.  

At least he was nowhere to be seen when he spoke before a crowd of thousands of cheering and adoring supporters at the Sharonville Convention Center Wednesday night.

With the Republican presidential nominating convention set to start in about two weeks in Cleveland, Ohio remains a tough fight for Donald Trump, the presumptive nominee, but one that could conceivably be won.

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Donald Trump will hold a public rally with Cincinnati area supporters Wednesday night at the Sharonville Convention Center, following a private fundraising event.

Pete Rightmire/WVXU

Hillary Clinton was in town Sunday for a fundraising dinner, followed Monday by a campaign event with Elizabeth Warren at the Cincinnati Museum Center at Union Terminal. Donald Trump is scheduled to come to Cincinnati next Wednesday for a fundraiser. 

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Donald J. Trump, the presumptive Republican nominee for president, will hold a private, high-dollar fundraising event in Cincinnati next Wednesday.

Tana Weingartner / WVXU

Hillary Clinton – with a potential running mate at her side – filled the Museum Center's rotunda Monday with supporters who were wildly enthusiastic about her message of giving power back to working people.

And Clinton and her partner on the stage, Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren, spent plenty of time bashing Donald Trump, the presumptive Republican nominee, as being unprepared and unable to handle the presidency.

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