2016 presidential election

Both Friday and Monday, Morning Edition Host Steve Inskeep broadcast from the WVXU studios as he talked with Ohio voters about the presidential election.  Maryanne Zeleznik had a chance to sit down with him to talk about what it's been like covering this particular election:


WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with news director Maryanne Zeleznik this morning about the impact Donald Trump's lewd and vulgar remarks about women in 2005 is already damaging his campaign in Ohio. 

Howard Wilkinson / WVXU

Ohio's junior U.S. senator, Rob Portman announced late Saturday he is rescinding his previous endorsement of Republican president nominee Donald Trump.

Portman was one of dozens of GOP leaders from around the country who have announced they can no longer support Trump, after the disclosure Friday of a 2005 video in which Trump makes lewd, vulgar comments about a married woman he said he wanted to have sex with.

Poor old Ohio. Once the bellwether of the nation; once the ultimate swing state in presidential elections.

Now, if you pay attention to some recent national news reports, Ohio is watching its bellwether status slip away. It is becoming the Rodney Dangerfield of American Politics, shifting its necktie and whining that it gets no respect.



On October 1, 1920, the executive committee of the League of Women Voters of Cincinnati held its first meeting. 

Pete Rightmire/WVXU


Monday night's match-up between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump was the most-watched presidential debate in history, with more than 84 million viewers. 

NPR's Live Debate Fact Checker

Sep 26, 2016

October 19 at 9pm:

Republican Donald Trump and Democrat Hillary Clinton face off in the final presidential debate Wednesday night at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. NPR's politics team, with help from reporters and editors who cover national security, immigration, business, foreign policy and more, is live annotating the debate.

Portions of the debate with added analysis are highlighted, followed by context and fact check from NPR reporters and editors.

Millennials. They're a bunch of tough nuts to crack.

Especially if you are Hillary Clinton and you look at polling which shows that the 18 to 35 year old voters aren’t exactly in love with you.


Since the 19th century, the only Democrats to lose Ohio yet win the presidency were John F. Kennedy and Franklin D. Roosevelt. And no Republican has ever lost the state and won the White House. 

There is a reason Ohio is called the bellwether of American presidential politics – a reason why it is watched so closely by the political professionals and the pundits every year.

Ohio is a microcosm of America, except in a few demographic categories, such as the percentage of Hispanic population – 17 percent nationwide, only 3.3 percent in Ohio.



Given just how unusual this presidential campaign has been, political pundits have found it difficult to accurately predict what is going to happen next. 

WVXU/Pete Rightmire


The first of three presidential candidate debates is just more than three weeks away. 

Ann Thompson / WVXU

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton, in a room full of thousands of men and women who have served in the nation's military, said her opponent wants to destroy the alliances "that generations of Americans in uniform have fought and died to create those bonds."

WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with Tana Weingartner Monday morning about polling in the presidential race, both in the key swing state of Ohio and nationally; and how Trump's campaign has gotten under the skin of of many GOP leaders, who want him to tone down his rhetoric.

 Let's imagine for a moment that you are Donald Trump, right now, today.

Alright, that may be an extraordinarily difficult task for many of you, but let's use our imaginations.

So you, Donald Trump, are coming out of what has been a very bad week.

With the Democratic National Convention only a week in the rear view mirror, this is the time when you, as the Republican nominee for president, need to be honing your message against your opponent, Hillary Clinton, and going on the offense  against her on a raft of potential issues.