2016 presidential election

Provided, Ken Rudin

The attacks in Paris last Friday placed national security and the continued threat from the Islamic State and other terrorist groups at the forefront of political discussions this week.

Political outsiders Donald Trump and Ben Carson continue to lead the Republican field of candidates by wide margins, Hillary is polling far ahead of Bernie Sanders, though his numbers actually went up after the first Democratic debate. And now neither has to worry about Vice President Joe Biden jumping into the race.

WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with Maryanne Zeleznik Monday morning about the sinking poll numbers in Ohio Gov. John Kasich's Republican presidential bid; and what's in store Tuesday night at the first Democratic presidential debate. 

  Last Monday, at the beginning of what turned out to be a not-so-hot week for Ohio’s governor, John Kasich, he said something at the opening of his New Hampshire presidential campaign headquarters that was very revealing; and very frank.

“We’ve got about 128 days to go until the New Hampshire primary,’’ the Boston Globe reported Kasich as saying. “We do well here; we’re moving on. We do terrible here; it’s over. No confusion about that. This is very, very important to us.”

Howard Wilkinson

Rand Paul, Kentucky’s junior senator, didn’t bring up the subject of his campaign for the Republican presidential nomination when he spoke to the Florence Rotary Club Monday, but he had plenty to say about it to reporters afterwards.

Paul, who is mired in the single digits in national polls, took a back-handed swipe at the Republican candidate who is leading most national polls, business mogul Donald Trump – and he did it without mentioning him by name.

WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with news director Maryanne Zeleznik Monday morning about the important role Hamilton County is likely to play in the presidential race next year; and how it will impact local races. 

In 2012, Time Magazine did a story based on an interesting premise: that five counties in Ohio – the ultimate swing state, the bellwether of the nation – could decide the presidential election between Barack Obama and Mitt Romney.

Yes, Hamilton County was one of them - perhaps the most important of them.

The others were Cuyahoga, Franklin, Stark and Montgomery.

Obama won them; won Ohio; and won a second term in the White House.

Provided / Wright State University

Wright State University will host the first presidential debate of 2016.

The Commission on Presidential Debates says the debate will be Monday, Sept. 26, 2016 at the Nutter Center.

  Hillary Clinton brought her presidential campaign into Ohio for the second time Thursday, holding a “Women for Hillary” rally in Columbus and two private fundraisers, one in Ohio’s capital city and another here in Cincinnati.

It was really not a very good day for the former secretary of state and U.S. Senator who remains (we guess) the front-runner for the 2016 Democratic presidential nomination.

With the presidential election still almost fifteen months away, many of us are already getting tired of hearing from and about the candidates, and the potential candidates, for president. But with, at last count, 22 declared candidates, the rising popularity of Bernie Sanders, Hillary’'s emails and the Trump, Trump, Trump of The Donald, for those who follow politics for a living, it is truly a wonderful time to be alive.