2013 election

A poll worker at an Avondale polling place who is alleged to have voted twice last in November’s election has been referred to the Hamilton County prosecutor for possible prosecution.

The county board of elections – two Democrats and two Republicans - voted unanimously Tuesday to send the case of veteran poll worker Ellen Duncan of Avondale to the prosecutor.

Some final thought on the 2013 election, before we move on to the 2014 election (which, of course, is already well underway).

Apathy wins by landslide:  On Dec. 1, John Cranley will be sworn in as Cincinnati’s 69th mayor, along with nine city council members – three of whom are newly-elected.

Live election coverage

Nov 1, 2013

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It’s official now.

The 2013 Cincinnati mayoral race between Democrats Roxanne Qualls and John Cranley will be the most expensive since the city began direct election of the mayor in 2001.

That’s not much history to go on, but a record is a record.

Campaign finance reports filed this week showed that Cranley, a former city council member, had raised $909,775 through the Oct. 16 cut-off date, while Qualls had raised $640,000.

Candidates for public office collect endorsements from groups and influential individuals the way that sports memorabilia enthusiasts collect autographed rookie baseball cards of Hall of Famers.

They hoard them.

And then they use them, for whatever they are worth, to get elected.

Cincinnati’s mayoral candidates, Roxanne Qualls and John Cranley have put together quite a collection.

Approximately 3,000 Cincinnati voters who have already been mailed absentee ballots will be getting a second one in the mail soon, thanks to an Ohio Supreme Court decision last week.

They'll also be getting a letter from the Hamilton County Board of Elections asking them to re-vote their new absentee ballots and return them to the board.

It's all because the Ohio Supreme Court ordered the board to restore sections of Issue 4, the charter amendment that would change the city of Cincinnati's pension system. The pro-Issue 4 committee had gone to court to force the change.

Yes, Cincinnati has a costly and contentious mayor’s race going on.

Yes, there is a mob of 21 candidates scrambling to win one of nine seats on city council. And, yes, there are plenty of controversial issues, from the streetcar to the parking lease to the city’s woeful pension system, for the candidates to argue about.

And yet, the truth is, there are clear indications that Nov. 5 will see the lowest turnout election in Cincinnati in many a decade. Maybe ever.

And what is the particular tea leaf we can read that would lead us to this conclusion?

UPDATE:

Ohio's top court says Hamilton County must amend its ballot language on a Cincinnati charter amendment ahead of the November election.

The Supreme Court Thursday ruled the county must include omitted sections of the proposed amendment to reform the city's employee pension program.  The group Cincinnati for Pension Reform put the issue on the ballot but objected to the modified language adopted by the Board of Elections.

Today is the deadline for Ohioans to register to vote in the Nov. 5  general election.

Voter registration forms can be downloaded at MyOhioVote.com, a website operated by Ohio Secretary of State Jon Husted, and are available from local boards of elections and other designated agencies, such as public libraries and offices of the Bureau of Motor Vehicles.

If voters have moved since the last election, they should act today to update their voting addresses online at MyOhioVote.com.

One thing is certain in this year’s Cincinnati City Council election – there will be at least one new member taking office on Dec. 1.

Vice Mayor Roxanne Qualls is running for mayor; and that opens her seat to one of the 13 challengers in a field of 21 candidates, which includes all eight incumbents.

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