The World

Weekdays at 8 PM
  • Hosted by Lisa Mullins

PRI’s The World is a one-hour, weekday radio news magazine offering a mix of news, features, interviews, and music from around the globe. Hosted by Lisa Mullins in Boston, it is the first global radio news program developed specifically for an American audience.

Ways to Connect

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Trevor Corson 

The first time I saw a doctor in the United States after I’d gotten my American health insurance, it wasn’t for anything serious. American friends had told me I should get an annual physical exam. That way, they explained, a record would exist that I’d been in good health. If I got sick later, the insurance company wouldn’t be able to claim that I’d hidden any pre-existing conditions.

Immigration is often front-page news these days in the US — how deportations split families, how the system is toughening. There are true stories that bring all of this to life, and then there are stories that are not real. Fiction. Stories that show what we cannot always see or hear when it comes to immigration.

Shanthi Sekaran's "Lucky Boy" does just that.

It's also the inaugural pick for the Global Nation Book Club, which you can join by heading to the Global Nation Exchange on Facebook

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© Art Gallery of Ontario, 2016. Courtesy of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

In 1944, photographer Henryk Ross dug a hole in the ground and buried his negatives — more than 6,000 of them. Ross was the official photographer of the Jewish ghetto in Lodz, Poland. He also lived there.

“His intention was really to preserve this record of the tragedy that they were living through, not knowing at that point whether he would survive or not,” says Kristen Gresh, the Estrellita and Yousuf Karsh curator of photographs at the Museum of Fine Arts (MFA) in Boston.

Baby Shafagh was born seven hours ago. In a refugee camp. Eight miles south of the Syrian-Jordanian border.

She's wrapped in a pink blanket. A white beanie covers her head.

In some ways, Shafagh is lucky. She came into this world in a maternity clinic, not a tent, and in a place where bombs are not falling overhead.

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Jason Lee/Reuters

As a second-generation Chinese American author, Gish Jen is well aware of the dangers of stereotyping.

That doesn't stop her from unpacking the controversial notion that a deep culture divide separates East and West when it comes to how we view the self and identity. 

Her new book, "The Girl At the Baggage Claim: Explaining the East-West Culture Gap," is a deep dive into the debate.

Photos: What do refugee parents tell their children about Syria?

Mar 22, 2017
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Alisa Reznick

A sign outside of the maternity clinic at the Zaatari refugee camp in Jordan tells you at any moment how many babies have been born at the camp. You can’t miss it.

The number updates with every single birth.

The day we visited, that number read 7,017. That’s more than 7,000 babies born in Zaatari over the past five years that the camp has been in operation. And, the camp itself is large, home to almost 80,000 people, according to the United Nations.

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Douglas Juarez/Reuters 

Peru is expected to experience another two weeks of highly unusual torrential rains, which have already caused devastating floods along large swaths of its arid coast, destroying homes and crops and killing an estimated 75 people.

The music of Colombia has long inspired people from across the world, but it holds a particular fascination for Will Holland, the British music producer better known as Quantic.

For years, he has worked with the Colombian bandleader, Mario Galeano, on a project called Ondatrópica, in which the pair lovingly re-examine and celebrate the country's musical heritage.

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Anna Boiko-Weyrauch

Between three jobs and a full academic course schedule, University of Washington senior Sam Le is always on the go. He also plans to graduate on time this June. But that wasn’t the case when he was a freshman and nearly flunked out.

“I was taking hard classes early on and I was commuting really far,” Le said. “I thought I could manage it, but I couldn’t.” 

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Jonathan Ernst/Reuters

If much of the US was transfixed by the sight on Monday of two of America’s top intelligence officials sitting in Congress, addressing allegations of Russian meddling in the US elections, the Kremlin claimed it had better things to do.

“We have many concerns in the Kremlin and following that [debate] isn’t one of them,” said presidential spokesman Dmitry Peskov.

“New information we’re not hearing and doubtfully will hear,” said Peskov, who went on to compare the hearings to a “broken record” being played ad nauseum.

After her dad had a stroke, 14-year-old Reina was brought to the San Jose Pinula public shelter near Guatemala’s capital with a promise she'd be taken care of.

A riot and massive fire at the shelter earlier this month left 42 of Reina's fellow residents dead. The tragedy has focused global attention on this nation’s treatment of women and girls.

Guatemalan authorities aren’t saying yet what caused the fire, but more than 500 children and teenagers were at the shelter, and rumors abound of abuse, trafficking and neglect.

Laptop, tablet bans on flights: Here's what we know

Mar 21, 2017

Britain and the US on Tuesday banned laptops and tablet computers from the passenger compartment of flights from several Middle East and North African nations.

The restrictions are different in the two countries and only Britain specified the maximum size of device allowed: 6.3 by 3.7 inches.

A French civil aviation agency spokesman said France was considering whether to impose similar measures.

Here is what we know so far:

Airports affected 

The US ban applies to flights from 10 airports in eight countries.

The airports affected are:

Six years ago, Ari Beser, a photographer from Baltimore, received a grant to visit the city of Hiroshima for the first time. He wanted to trace the path his grandfather had once taken. Jacob Beser, who died in 1992, flew over Japan as a member of the Army Air Force during World War II.

On the day that Beser got the grant, a tsunami struck the coast of Japan, flooding Fukushima nuclear power plant and causing an explosion and meltdown.

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Deepa Fernandes

At a recent bolero concert at Havana’s Cine Acapulco, emcee and lead crooner, Alberto, had the audience entranced. He poked fun at himself and them. He also recited a love poem. Later, three other dapper men joined Alberto onstage, and together, they sang traditional Cuban love songs.

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<a href="https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/User:Strebe">Daniel R. Strebe</a>/<a href="https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Gall%E2%80%93Peters_projection_SW.jpg">CC BY 2.0 (image cropped)</a>

There's nothing like a map to help explain the world. But some maps do a better job of it than others.

Which is why Boston's public schools have adopted new world maps for some of their classrooms. And, the district claims that it's the first public school system nationwide to make the switch.

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