The World

Weekdays at 8 PM
  • Hosted by Lisa Mullins

PRI’s The World is a one-hour, weekday radio news magazine offering a mix of news, features, interviews, and music from around the globe. Hosted by Lisa Mullins in Boston, it is the first global radio news program developed specifically for an American audience.

Visit The World website.

Did religion save this Guatemalan town?

Aug 26, 2016
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Daniel LeClair/Reuters

In seeking the evangelical vote, Donald Trump has been shunned by many a pastor put off by his behavior and values.

He has gotten support, though, among some evangelical adherents of the Prosperity Gospel, who believe that faith can bring material reward.

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Aaron P. Bernstein/Reuters

The evening of August 13 started out as a reporting assignment for Aaron Mak, a Yale student and intern at the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. It turned into a lesson about policing, race and protest in today's America.

Milwaukee police had just shot and killed a black man named Sylville Smith, and when Mak arrived at the scene, hundreds of people had already gathered in protest.

BLM Politico piece

North Korea claims it’s now able to nuke the US mainland

Aug 25, 2016
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KCNA via Reuters

North Korea's in a good mood these days.

The nation is celebrating its first successful test of a submarine-launched missile.

The country's leader — Kim Jong Un — says the US mainland is now within striking range of his nuclear weapons.

That sounds like a threat.

Joel Wit, a former US nuclear negotiator with North Korea, says he's concerned, but not worried. "Because — despite this success — we’re not within striking range of their nuclear weapons."

Lisseth has been locked up in family immigration detention for close to 365 days with her 6-year-old and she wants it to be known.

That’s why she joined a hunger strike at Berks County Residential Center in Pennylvania. After 16 days of skipping the three meals offered, Lisseth says she began to feel weak and nauseated. She is from El Salvador and crossed the southern border in Texas to seek asylum in the US. She fears retaliation for speaking to the press, so she asked us not to use her real name.

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Thomas Hawk/Flicker

It is illegal for women to get an abortion in Ireland unless the pregnancy directly threatens her life.

With no other options, two women live-tweeted as they traveled to the United Kingdom for the procedure.

@TwoWomenTravel live-tweeted from Friday to Sunday. The description of the Twitter account states “Two Women, one procedure, 48 hours away from home.”

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Rachel Waldholz

The largest commercial cruise ship ever to attempt the Northwest Passage starts sailing through its frigid waters this week.  

The sea route over the top of Canada has historically been impassable, but ice melting in the Arctic has in recent years cleared a path for shipping vessels. Now, a 1,600-person, 13-deck cruise ship is plying those waters, too.

The Crystal Serenity left Seward, Alaska last week on a 32-day cruise that will take it around Alaska, through the Canadian Arctic, past Greenland and finally to New York.   

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Aaron Labaree

Trucks began hauling storm wreckage from the formerly flooded streets of Baton Rouge this week. They aren’t ordinary garbage trucks. They’re not even big dump trucks used to cart away construction waste.

They’re purpose-built “storm trucks” — sleek, black, 40 feet long, each carrying two huge bins that together can hold 15 tons of possessions and mementos — and each truck with its own mechanical claw that can lift more than a ton of memories at a time.

The 2016 Rio Summer Olympics was not just about the sports, the doping, or the drama — it also featured a riot of Brazilian culture and music.

From the start, the organizers brought out stars as well as some of Brazil’s lesser-known cultural contributions, from 12-year-old MC Soffia’s empowering hip-hop to Ludmilla, Rio’s queen of Carioca funk.

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<a href="https://www.facebook.com/LaGenteAndaDiciendo/">La Gente Anda Diciendo/Facebook</a>

You're sitting in a cafe in Buenos Aires' Palermo neighborhood. You can't quite hear what the pair next to you is talking about, but you can make out some things. Maybe something like, "You think I have nothing better to do than be in love with you."

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Christina Asquith/PRI

When it comes to making Turkish sweets, the Altan family sticks to tradition.

Since 1865, Altan Sekerleme candy shop has served handmade Turkish delights and akide hard candies from the same store nestled in the cobblestone streets of Istanbul’s Kucukpazar neighborhood. Steeped in the centuries-old commercial life of the former Ottoman capital, the family trade has been passed down from father to son for four generations.

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