Here & Now

Monday – Thursday at 2:00 pm
  • Hosted by Jeremy Hobson, Robin Young

A live production from NPR and WBUR Boston, in collaboration with public radio stations across the country, Here & Now reflects the fluid world of news as it’s happening, with timely, smart and in-depth news and conversation.

Here & Now has a successful track record: it began at WBUR in 1997 and is carried today by over 180 stations nationwide. Here & Now will expand from one to two hours on July 1 in collaboration with NPR. The expanded program will serve as a bridge in midday, between NPR’s signature news magazines, Morning Edition and All Things Considered. This marks the first time NPR has collaborated with a member station on a daily news program.

Trump Announces Plan To Lower Drug Prices

May 11, 2018

President Trump announces a plan Friday to lower drug prices, something he’s been talking about since his campaign. Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson speaks with Michael Regan (@Reganonymous), senior editor for Bloomberg News, about the plan.

In Nashville, It's Catfish On Ice

May 10, 2018

The Nashville Predators and Winnipeg Jets square off in a Game 7, winner-take-all showdown in the NHL’s second-round playoffs Thursday night. The game will be played in Nashville, where there’s one slightly illicit tradition that can be as much of a spectacle as the game itself.

Just after the national anthem, fans throw catfish onto the ice.

President Trump thanked North Korean leader Kim Jong Un for unexpectedly releasing three Americans held as prisoners in North Korea ahead of a planned summit between the two leaders. The detainees arrived back in the U.S. overnight.

NPR national political correspondent Mara Liasson (@MaraLiasson) joins Here & Now‘s Robin Young to discuss the circumstances of the detainees’ capture and release.

It’s graduation season, which means an annual walk across the stage that many graduates assume they will make. For others, it’s a miracle.

Rosibeth Cuevas will soon become the first person in her family to graduate from college. But that’s not the miracle.

Four years ago, Cuevas was a senior at Manual Arts High School in South Los Angeles. She dreamed of going to college in rural Northern California at Humboldt State University, and joined others who would be first-generation college students on a 12-hour bus trip to the school on April 10, 2014.

The clothing brand LuLaRoe has many fans of its patterned leggings and geometrically designed dresses, which are sold by women out of their homes. But thousands of these “consultants,” as the company calls them, have left LuLaRoe. Several filed lawsuits last fall alleging the company was a pyramid scheme.

Recipes To Help You Spring Into Summer

May 9, 2018

Late-spring days are warm — but the evenings can still be chilly. Here & Now resident chef Kathy Gunst brings hosts Jeremy Hobson and Robin Young three dishes that make the most of spring vegetables, but still provide a bit of cool-weather comfort.

NPR’s Uri Berliner (@uberliner) joins Here & Now‘s to assess the impact of Iran sanctions on the U.S. economy.

Chinese exports of steel and aluminum are up according to the latest figures, despite new tariffs imposed by the Trump administration in March.

Liu He, Chinese President Xi Jinping’s top economic adviser, will visit Washington next week to continue trade talks between the two countries.

President Trump today announced he will pull the U.S. out of the 2015 deal with Iran that gave the country relief from economic sanctions in exchange for restrictions on its nuclear program.

The opioid epidemic has spurred medical professionals to look for nonpharmaceutical approaches to pain management. There’s a growing consensus among pain experts that a low-tech approach focused on lifestyle changes can be more effective than opioids.

The Case For The Fair-Weather Sports Fan

May 7, 2018

In the NBA playoffs Monday night, it’s the Philadelphia 76ers versus the Boston Celtics and the Toronto Raptors against the Cleveland Cavaliers.

So is it OK to root for, say, the Golden State Warriors, who play Tuesday, if you aren’t from the Golden State? Or should you hide your soft spot for LeBron James if you don’t live in Cleveland?

Language Advisory: This segment contains language some listeners may find offensive.


Atlanta’s hip-hop scene is booming with new music from well-known acts like Migos and Lil Yachty. But there’s a long list of up-and-comers bringing fresh sounds to the city.

Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein dismissed threats of impeachment Tuesday and said the Justice Department “is not going to be extorted.”

NPR’s Phil Ewing (@philewing) joins Here & Now‘s Robin Young to talk about the increasing pressure on Rosenstein from supporters of President Trump.

In North Carolina, a project is converting pig waste into renewable natural gas for electricity. The system eliminates pig farms’ methane, a climate change gas, and is helping the state move away from fossil fuels.

James Morrison (@JCMorrisn) reports for WUNC.

It’s May: the start of graduation season. Speakers everywhere will try to live up to the wise words of what was rumored to be Kurt Vonnegut — then revealed to be a column from The Chicago Tribune’s Mary Schmich — which Baz Luhrmann made into a hit in the ’90s.

Two women, including a former NBC correspondent, have accused retired anchor Tom Brokaw of sexually harassing them in the 1990s.

It’s the season of art auctions. Every spring, charities gather donors in ballrooms and galleries across the country, and auction off a range of enticing items — from a weekend at a luxury resort to free yoga classes to fine art. For many nonprofits, it’s their most important fundraising event of the year.

The five black women kicked off the course at the Grandview Golf Club in York, Pennsylvania, last weekend are not sure what happens now.

The women, all middle-aged professionals, members of the club and a broader organization for black female golfers called Sisters in the Fairway, were on the second hole when the owner’s father, Steve Chronister, told them they were playing too slow and offered them a refund to leave.

Author Kirk Johnson‘s new book “The Feather Thief” explores the 2009 theft of rare Victorian-era bird feathers from a British museum by American music student Edwin Rist, who was obsessed with using the feathers for exotic fishing lures.

Inspired by a poem, an art exhibit on sexual assault titled “What Were You Wearing?” re-creates outfits survivors had on when they were assaulted, alongside personal stories.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young talks with Jen Brockman, one of the creators of the installation and director of the Sexual Assault Prevention and Education Center at the University of Kansas.

The leaders of North and South Korea meet for the first time since 2007 on Friday. The meeting will set the stage for an expected meeting between President Trump and Kim Jong Un, where the North’s nuclear weapons program will be the main topic.

It’s not easy for a professional musician to give up their own instrument and play with another. But in Nashville, members of the symphony are performing around the city using the “Violins of Hope” — a collection of string instruments that survived the Holocaust.

Emily Siner (@SinerSays) from WPLN has the story.

The Iran nuclear deal will be one of the big items on the agenda Tuesday during French President Emmanuel Macron’s visit with President Trump. Macron wants the U.S. to stick with the deal, but President Trump has been a harsh critic of the agreement.

Here & Now‘s Eric Westervelt (@Ericnpr) speaks with MSNBC’s Ali Velshi (@AliVelshi), co-host of “Velshi & Ruhle.”

President Trump hinted over the weekend that he might grant a posthumous pardon to boxer Jack Johnson. Johnson was the first African-American world heavyweight champion, but he also was the subject of a racially motivated arrest.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young speaks with Jesse Washington (@jessewashington), senior writer for ESPN’s The Undefeated.

The toymaker Hasbro reported weaker-than-expected earnings Monday, and the company’s CEO pointed to the ongoing liquidation of Toys R Us stores in the U.S. as a cause. Toys R Us was one of Hasbro’s largest customers, and it filed for bankruptcy in September.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young learns more from USA Today’s Charisse Jones (@charissejones).

The Austrian pediatrician Hans Asperger is known for his pioneering work describing the form of autism that now bears his name. But previously unexamined documents now show Asperger was also involved with a notorious euthanasia program run by Nazis in Austria.

U.S. troops are involved in combat, counterterrorism or combat support missions in Iraq, Africa, the Philippines and elsewhere. This year marks the American military’s 17th year in Afghanistan.

Editor’s Note: This segment discusses rape and sexual violence, and contains audio that some listeners may find disturbing or offensive.


There have been protests in northern India this week over the rape and murder of an 8-year-old Muslim girl in January. The case has taken a political turn, because two officials from Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s party protested in favor of the accused men, who are Hindus. Those officials resigned last week.

Philadelphia District Attorney Larry Krasner once called himself “unelectable.” Yet the 57-year-old attorney, known for being as outspoken as he is progressive, was sworn into office in January after winning the November election in a landslide.

The list of aging rock ‘n’ roll musicians who have damaged their hearing after a long career on stage is growing.

Huey Lewis and the News canceled its 2018 tour last week after Lewis told fans that he “can’t hear music well enough to sing.”

Eric Clapton told the BBC this year that he is going deaf.

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