Focus on Technology

Monday afternoons during Cincinnati Edition, 1:00 - 2:00 pm

Ann Thompson reports on the latest trends in technology and their effects on medicine, safety, the environment or entertainment.

University of Cincinnati/Hankook

The South Korean based tire company, Hankook has just unveiled its latest tire at the Frankfort Auto Show, the iFlex. That tire may have ties to Cincinnati.

The Environmental Protection Agency is working to finalize a plan that would essentially ban coal-fire power plants in their present form. New ones could not be built without having cutting-edge technology that dramatically reduces CO2. It's called carbon capture and sequestration (CCS). The proposal, announced last month, by EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy at the National Press Club, is not expected to be a requirement for more than a year.

Ann Thompson / WVXU

By the end of the year, the Federal Aviation Administration says it will pick six sites to test unmanned aerial systems (UAS). The Dayton region hopes to be on the list and has taken another step to set itself apart.

On Monday Sinclair Community College announced:

By 2015 President Obama has said he wants to have one-million plug-in electric vehicles on the road. It’s unclear if that’s going to happen. But slowly researchers are making progress in building a better battery and states are realizing the battery market is a very lucrative one.

This month Ohio State's Buckeye Bullet is trying to break the 400 mph barrier in the salt flats of Utah. It runs on lithium-ion batteries. This is an earlier video when the futuristic car was hitting speeds in the 300s.

Jacqueline McBride/LLNL

Have you ever wanted an instant diagnosis? Medical tests can often take hours, days, or weeks to generate results. This can delay medication. Patients face this problem frequently as they wait  for tests on things like the flu and strep throat.

But there is a device developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Lab in California that is able to identify germs in less than three minutes. (expected to be on the market in about 5 years)

Watch this video to find out what it is and how it works.

As of August, 2013 statistics show there are more than

  • one billion people using Facebook
  • 500 million on Twitter
  • 1 billion uploading and watching YouTube videos
  • 200 million with a Pandora account
  • 238 million on LinkedIn.

Those numbers are increasing daily and so is your data. CEO and founder of LifeCellar.com Stephen Bulfer estimates we will each create 88 gigabytes of data by age 75. According to Digital Beyond bloggers John Romano and Evan Carroll  

Arch Biopartners

Imagine a world where a spray-on gel could make make cars and boats corrosion-proof, airplanes more aerodynamic, the flow in wastewater treatment plants faster and prevent surfaces from harboring bacteria.

That protective coating, invisible to the naked eye, may not be too far away according to Arch Biopartners. Within two years, principal scientist Randy Irvin says the initial application will be a methanol-based spray

Unequal Technologies

Major League Baseball is working with a couple of different companies to design a special pitchers baseball cap that would protect them if hit in the head.  MLB medical director Dr. Gary Green says he's trying to

Google

Ann Thompson / WVXU

GE's electrical power systems business, with an eye toward the increasing need for power on airplanes, is about to open the first of its kind research facility on the campus of the University of Dayton. The EPISCENTER (Electrical Power Integrated Systems Center) will provide the floor space and infrastructure needed to test four complete electrical systems.

Would you go to Mars?

Jul 17, 2013
An artist's rendering for Mars One

Ten years from now a crew of four people may just be getting used to the Red Planet. Eventually up to 40 people could populate a colony on Mars. Would you go? 

The Moerlein Lager House now has an employee who constantly monitors social media and immediately brings any unwanted publicity to the boss's attention. It's been that way since the restaurant was embroiled in controversy more than a year ago when it took out full page ads calling itself "Wrigley South."

Holly Yurchison / WVXU

The City of Mason is quickly becoming a magnet for high-tech companies.   Faced with challenging economic times and competition from neighboring cities, Mason decided to get creative to target these sectors:

  • Biohealth
  • Biohealth IT
  • Digital IT

Dottie Stover, University of Cincinnati

The first step in developing a Tricorder device may only be a few years away. UC researcher Jason Heikenfeld is testing his band-aid like patch. With just a few drops of sweat, it will monitor health and diagnose disease on people and in the lab using artificial skin that mimics sweat. Ann Thompson reports in "Focus on Technology."

New Jersey Institute of Technology

Interest in "smart guns," using biometrics and radio frequency technology, has rebounded following recent gun violence. President Obama has included them as part of his plan to reduce such mass shootings. Who makes these guns? How do they work? And will they catch on? Ann Thompson reports in "Focus on Technology."

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