Cincinnati Edition

Monday – Friday at 1:00 pm

Cincinnati Edition covers topics from regional government to business, education, health, technology and the arts.

You can join the discussion with decision-makers, authors, and voices from around the region and beyond by calling 513 419-7100, emailing, and messaging through Facebook and Twitter.

Support for Cincinnati Edition comes from  The Johnson Foundation and The Carol Ann and Ralph V. Haile Jr. / US Bank Foundation.

  Born into post-apartheid South Africa, the young women of the townships around Cape Town still face daunting challenges. Their families and communities have been ravaged by poverty, violence, sexual abuse, and AIDS. Yet, as Kimberly Burge discovered when she set up a writing group in the township of Gugulethu, the spirit of these girls outshines their circumstances. 

Provided, Interfaith Hospitality Network of Greater Cincinnati

  Kimberly Burge, author of The Born Frees: Writing with the Girls of Gugulethu, will be participating at an event tomorrow evening at the YWCA of Greater Cincinnati. The discussion will include guests from local service agencies that work in support of women’s needs, and focus on raising women’s voices at the local, national and international levels. 

The ultimate in environmentally friendly housing might be a structure made partially of water. There is such a house in Kecskemet, Hungary. That's near where the architect who designed it grew up.

Matyas Gutai, PhD  got his inspiration to build the structure from open air hot baths in Tokyo, where despite the cold temperature outside, it was kept comfortably warm inside.

Seniors are often inviting targets for financial fraud because of the substantial assets they've accumulated over their lifetimes. A 2010 Investor Protection Trust  Elder Fraud Survey showed that more than seven million older Americans,– one out of every five citizens over the age of 65 – have been victimized by a financing swindle, involving everything from reverse mortgages to precious metals.

Keep Cincinnati Beautiful is a nonprofit organization that decreases litter and blight in the city, promotes sustainability, and cultivates community pride through education and beautification. A local public relations firm is working with Keep Cincinnati Beautiful to raise awareness of its efforts to keep our city looking good. They came up with The Seven Summits Challenge, one man'’s attempt to conquer the seven hills of Cincinnati, all in one day, collecting trash along the way. Dangerous? Probably not. Clever? Without a doubt.

Copyright Jeannette Montgomery Barron / Courtesy of ClampArt, New York City

In April, 1990, an art exhibit opened in Cincinnati that created immediate controversy, placed the Contemporary Arts Center on a national stage, and sparked a legal battle over the first amendment.

The popularity of bourbon has surged during the past decade. As evidence, just look at the number of bars locally dedicated to the drink. In Bourbon Curious: A Simple Tasting Guide for the Savvy Drinker, award-winning whiskey writer and Wall Street Journal best-selling author Fred Minnick creates an easy-to-read interactive tasting journey that helps you select barrel-aged bourbons based on your flavor preferences.

The three buildings on Fourth Street that were once home to high-end fashion retailer Gidding-Jenny after the two companies merged in 1962, and more recently to discount retailer T.J. Maxx, could soon have a new owner and a new life.


During this program, anti-Issue 22 advocate Donald J. Mooney Jr. was critical of the Cincinnati Park Board for taking a $200,000 donation from the private Meyer Fund and giving it to Great Parks, Great Neighborhoods Inc., a committee that is campaigning to pass the charter amendment. Mooney questioned the legality of giving the money to Great Parks, Great Neighborhoods. Attorney Tim Burke, a supporter of Issue 22 and a former park board member, argued that it was perfectly legal and that no public funds were given to the pro-Issue 22 campaign.

City planner and urban designer Jeff Speck believes America has a variety of problems, from public health to the economy, that could be solved by making cities more friendly for pedestrians. In his latest book, Walkable City: How Downtown Can Save America, One Step at a Time, he lays out a 10-step plan for changing the way we build and think about our public spaces.