Cincinnati Edition

Monday – Friday at 1:00 pm

Cincinnati Edition covers topics from regional government to business, education, health, technology and the arts.

You can join the discussion with decision-makers, authors, and voices from around the region and beyond by calling 513 419-7100, emailing talk@wvxu.org, and messaging through Facebook and Twitter.

Support for Cincinnati Edition comes from  The Johnson Foundation and The Carol Ann and Ralph V. Haile Jr. / US Bank Foundation.

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Richard Conniff is a writer and speaker on human and animal behavior, author of several books including “House of Lost Worlds,” "Natural History of the Rich,” and “The Species Seekers.” 

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There are many benefits to collecting your own seeds or trading seeds with other gardeners in your area, from preserving heirloom plants to finding new varieties to try.

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A University of Dayton researcher is creating a different way to study drugs that could potentially shorten the time it takes to develop them.

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In 2012, Kim Dinan and her husband Brian uprooted their lives to travel around the world. Just before their departure, they received a yellow envelope containing a check and instructions to give the money away to those they encountered on their journey.

Major League Baseball

Our unofficial holiday, Opening Day in Cincinnati, is just one week away. Joining us to discuss how the Reds will perform this season are Hal McCoy  with the Dayton Daily News; sports writer John Erardi; Cincinnati Reds historian Greg Rhodes; and WVXU reporter and avid baseball fan Howard Wilkinson

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Each Friday on Cincinnati Edition, we present an in-depth discussion of the developments behind the headlines.

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Gateway Community and Technical College, founded in 2002, is Northern Kentucky's only public, accredited, comprehensive two-year institution. Last summer, Dr. Fernando Figueroa became Gateway's President and CEO, only the second in the school's history.

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The National Council on Aging estimates that one in every 10 Americans, aged 60 or older, has been the victim of some type of abuse or neglect. But elder abuse is a hidden crime that often goes unreported. It’s estimated that authorities are notified of only one in 14 cases.

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Kentucky Senate Bill 120 has been approved by both the Kentucky House and Senate and seems likely to move out of the General Assembly and on to Governor Matt Bevin's desk for his signature. If signed into law, the legislation would bring major reforms to the Kentucky criminal justice system.

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In April 2015, Archbishop Desmond Tutu traveled to the Dalai Lama's home in Dharamsala, India, to celebrate His Holiness's eightieth birthday and to create what they hoped would be a gift for others. They looked back on their long lives to answer a single question: How do we find joy in the face of life's inevitable suffering? 

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While a student at the University of Cincinnati, James Avant IV was diagnosed with obsessive compulsive disorder. To help alleviate his anxiety he turned to baking, and in 2014, James launched OCD Cakes, a bakery with a mental health awareness mission.

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Author Patricia Schultz has almost four million copies of her 1,000 Places to See Before You Die books now in print. She recently released an updated third edition of "1,000 Places to See in the United States & Canada Before You Die," a collection of the many fun, interesting and diverse destinations to be found virtually in our own backyard. She talked with Mark Heyne about this latest edition and how she discovered the places and events she included in her must-see list. 

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This Friday, the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center will present the world premier of the exhibition, Mandela: The Journey to Ubuntu. The exhibition commemorates the life and legacy of former South African President Nelson Mandela through the photographs of Matthew Willman

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The water crisis in Flint, Michigan last year raised awareness of the severe health damage caused by the lack of clean water. And while most communities in the Unites States take clean water for granted, according to a government Indian Health Service report, about 7.5 percent of Native American and Alaska Native homes did not have safe drinking water or basic sanitation as of 2013.

University of Colorado

A team of University of Colorado Boulder engineers has developed a revolutionary process that cools buildings without the use of refrigerants or electricity.

The material, described in the journal Science, is a glass polymer hybrid and even under direct sunlight can cool objects.

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