Cincinnati Edition

Monday – Friday at 1:00 pm

Cincinnati Edition covers topics from regional government to business, education, health, technology and the arts.

You can join the discussion with decision-makers, authors, and voices from around the region and beyond by calling 513 419-7100, emailing, and messaging through Facebook and Twitter.

Support for Cincinnati Edition comes from  The Johnson Foundation and The Carol Ann and Ralph V. Haile Jr. / US Bank Foundation.

When most people in Greater Cincinnati refer to “"the river”" they usually mean the Ohio, but the Licking River also plays a vital role in our region'’s history, environment and economy. Senior Reporting Fellow with the Kentucky Center for Public Service Journalism, Andy Mead, spent more than a year on and off exploring the Licking River, from its beginnings in the mountains of Kentucky more than 300 miles south of Cincinnati, to where it flows into the Ohio. His seven-part series recently ran in the Northern Kentucky Tribune, an online publication of the Kentucky Center for Public Service Journalism.

Ann Thompson / WVXU

Joe Glisson hates unnecessary steps. Last fall the Cincinnati Fire Lt. was getting frustrated by the moment when collecting leaves in the very small leaf blower bag attachment and then having to transfer them to a much larger yard waste bag.

At his Springfield Township home Glisson demonstrated how cumbersome it can be to have to fill up one bag and dump it into another.

He now has a solution to the problem. His invention is called "The Eliminator."

Being the parent of a child who struggles in school can be both challenging and frustrating. But parents of gifted children face their own challenges and frustrations. And while most schools are able to recognize students who need extra help and provide them with additional tutoring and guidance, many schools are not equipped to meet the needs of truly gifted students.

The Jacob Rader Marcus Center of the American Jewish Archives (AJA), located on the Cincinnati campus of Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion, was established in 1947 to collect, preserve, and make available for research, materials on the history of Jews and Jewish communities in the Western Hemisphere. Today, the AJA is the world’'s largest free-standing research center dedicated solely to the study of the American Jewish experience.

The number of individuals in Greater Cincinnati experiencing homelessness has dropped in recent years, but there are still far too many men, women and children, entire families, who do not have a safe, secure, stable, place to sleep each night. Recently, more than 60 service organizations came together to create a plan to identify and proactively address the needs of homeless families.

We continue our discussion of the homeless situation in Greater Cincinnati by looking at homelessness prevention programs designed to help families avoid entering shelters, with Jewish Family Service Director of Vital Services Fran Gafvert; executive director of St. Vincent DePaul, Mike Dunn; and, Strategies to End Homelessness Executive Director Kevin Finn.

The Hamilton County Board of Commissioners is currently deliberating the proposed 2016 General Fund Budget submitted by the county administrator. The budget funds the county'’s government services, including the Sheriff'’s Department, the Prosecutor’'s office and courts system.

Today, women make up 20 percent of new recruits to our armed services, and the percentage of U.S. veterans who are women is now about 10 percent. But women transitioning from the service to civilian life face many challenges that are unique to them, or greater than those faced by their male counterparts.

  After the strange weather we had this summer, it has been a beautiful fall, so far, prompting even people who don’t like yard work to get outside, rake leaves or work in their gardens. But there is plenty to do now to make the most of the nice weather we have left before the temperatures drop, and prepare our yards and gardens for winter. 

  Born into post-apartheid South Africa, the young women of the townships around Cape Town still face daunting challenges. Their families and communities have been ravaged by poverty, violence, sexual abuse, and AIDS. Yet, as Kimberly Burge discovered when she set up a writing group in the township of Gugulethu, the spirit of these girls outshines their circumstances.