Cincinnati Edition

Monday – Friday at 1:00 pm

Cincinnati Edition covers topics from regional government to business, education, health, technology and the arts.

You can join the discussion with decision-makers, authors, and voices from around the region and beyond by calling 513 419-7100, emailing talk@wvxu.org, and messaging through Facebook and Twitter.

Support for Cincinnati Edition comes from  The Johnson Foundation and The Carol Ann and Ralph V. Haile Jr. / US Bank Foundation.

  

    A recent survey found that only 34% of adults with intellectual disabilities in the United States are employed. That includes several thousand individuals in Greater Cincinnati. For years, training centers or sheltered workshops have provided work opportunities for adults with disabilities. But there is a current push in many states to close these centers and direct individuals towards community-based employment. But incorporating people with intellectual disabilities into the general workforce is a challenge.

Provided, Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County

  Serving with Honor: The Queen City’'s Veterans, an exhibit now at the Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County and running through mid-January, profiles some of the many veterans from the Greater Cincinnati area who took up the call of duty, starting from the War of 1812 to the present day. Photos, diaries, letters, uniforms, medals and other artifacts from local veterans will be on display.

  For a long time, in most parts of the world, people saw Americans as cowboys. Mainly because that'’s how we saw ourselves. From 1955 to 1964, adult Westerns made up as much as 25% of all prime-time television. Wagon Train, Maverick, Gunsmoke, Bonanza, and dozens of other programs painted the rough justice of the American West. At least the popular version of it.

  Hard to believe that just a short time ago, the big hi-tech Christmas gift was the iPad, just that one model. Today, a hi-tech wish list can go on for pages: smartphones, smart watches, tablets, gaming systems, 3D printers, and new ways to control your lights, thermostat, or your entire home. And with all of those choices, finding the right gadget for the right person can get tricky. The USB-powered fiber optic Christmas tree looks cool in the catalog, but will it really be appreciated? And, seriously, who needs a can-opener you can control with your smartphone?

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