Cincinnati Edition

Monday – Friday at 1:00 pm

Cincinnati Edition covers topics from regional government to business, education, health, technology and the arts.

You can join the discussion with decision-makers, authors, and voices from around the region and beyond by calling 513 419-7100, emailing talk@wvxu.org, and messaging through Facebook and Twitter.

Mental Health reporting supported by Rosemary and Frank Bloom

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The Front Row with Betsy Ross
12:45 am
Fri August 31, 2012

Tommy John surgery

Stephen Strasburg of the Washington Nationals

As the Washington Nationals consider shutting down pitching phenom Stephen Strasburg to save his arm after Tommy John surgery, questions have been raised about this procedure and long term effects on a pitcher. Ken Rusche from Oxford Physical Therapy is in The Front Row with Betsy Ross to discuss Tommy John surgery and pitching.

On the Money with Chris DeSimio
12:45 am
Fri August 31, 2012

Rich Boehne of E.W. Scripps

E.W. Scripps

From selling subscriptions to the Cincinnati Post as a teen, to now serving as president and chief executive officer of the E.W. Scripps Company he is Rich Boehne and he will be On the Money with Chris DeSimio to discuss today’s media landscape.

The Week in Review
12:45 am
Fri August 31, 2012

The Week in Review

WVXU"s Jay Hanselmn

Jay Hanselman takes a look at the week's top stories.

The Big Screen
1:50 am
Fri August 24, 2012

Review: Killer Joe

A scene from "Killer Joe."

Theoretically speaking, what might you get if you put the collected works of Tennessee Williams, John Waters and Quentin Tarantino in a blender and then ran it through a projector? I’m guessing you would get a film on the order of Killer Joe, the latest film from Oscar-winning director William Friedkin, who gave us The French Connection, The Exorcist, and one of my favorites, The Night They Raided Minsky's.

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Focus on Technology
1:50 am
Fri August 24, 2012

Testing New Medications Using Tissue Chips

Doctoral Student Kyle McCracken looks at a partially functioning stomach he has grown from human stem cells

Ann Thompson’s Focus on Technology reports researchers are developing tissue chips that accurately model human organs, such as the lungs, liver and heart. As a result, scientists at Cincinnati Children’s and others may be able to test new drugs faster, safer, and more cost effectively than present methods.

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