Maryanne Zeleznik

News Director and Morning Edition Host

In 2005, Maryanne Zeleznik came to 91.7 WVXU from WNKU where she served as News and Public Affairs Director for 20 years. At WVXU she is responsible for all news and public affairs programming, covers daily news, produces local features, regularly contributes news stories to National Public Radio, and hosts Morning Edition Monday through Friday, and fills in to host Cincinnati Edition when Mark Heyne is off. 

Zeleznik has won numerous regional and national journalism awards including the Leo C. Lee Award for significant contributions to public radio news from the Public Radio News Directors Incorporated, as well as awards from Ohio Associated Press, Ohio Society of Professional Journalists, and the Cincinnati Chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists.  In 2016 The Salesian Guild honored her as Distinguished Communicator of the year. 

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Michael E. Keating

UPDATE 5/1/14 3:16pm

The Kentucky State Police has denied Boone County's request. In a release, the Boone County Sheriff's Department says the KSP cited policy and current protocol in denying the request.

UPDATE 5/1/14  Boone County Sheriff asks Kentucky State Police to investigate.  Here's the release: 

On Friday, May 1, 2014 Sheriff Michael A. Helmig officially requested the Kentucky State Police to investigate the shooting involving Deputy Tyler Brockman on River Road on Saturday, April 26, 2014.

  Toyota is leaving its headquarters in Erlanger, Kentucky. The company announced Monday it’s building a new headquarters in Plano, Texas. The move is expected to take a couple of years, but it already has many concerned about what it will mean to the Greater Cincinnati Region.

Provided, ArtWorks

  John A. Ruthven, naturalist, author, lecturer, and internationally acknowledged master of wildlife art, was fascinated by nature as a young boy growing up in Cincinnati. The man often called the "20th Century Audubon," is still fascinated, with nature and art, and enjoys sharing his knowledge with young artists. We talk with John Ruthven and Teresa Hoelle, vice president of Development & External Affairs for ArtWorks. Mr.

Earth Day 2014

Apr 22, 2014

  Many consider Earth Day 1970 the birth of the modern environmental movement. Since then, each year on April 22, millions of people all over the world take some action in support of a greener, cleaner, more sustainable environment.

Taft Museum of Art

  Cincinnati as far back as the early 1800s was considered a haven for artists. Born in Covington, Frank Duveneck was a celebrated artist at 27, went on to teach in Europe, and in Cincinnati, and influenced generations of future artists. We talk with Taft Museum of Art Assistant Curator Tamera Muente about the life and work of Frank Duveneck, and his paintings now on display at the Taft.

Maryanne Zeleznik reports the local news on December 11, 2013.

Provided, Survive Institute

  What would you do if attacked in a dark parking garage or assaulted on a deserted city street? Most of us would probably freeze. But for more than 30 years, Mike and Debbie Gardner of the Survive Institute have been training people how to be aware of their surroundings, to avoid confrontations when possible, and to defend themselves when necessary. Defense experts and “Courage Coaches” Mike and Debbie Gardner join us to talk about what they term, “Self-defense with love.”

Provided, Rajiv Satyal

  Rajiv Satyal, who has opened for comedians such as Kevin James and Tim Allen, did a comedy tour of India for the U.S. State Department, and has recently been performing to sold-out crowds across the country, is in town to perform his one-man show. The former Proctor & Gamble executive entered and won a “Funniest Person in Cincinnati” contest years ago, and now works full time as a comedian, writer and actor.

Provided, Harper Collins


Provided, University of Cincinnati
Procter & Gamble / Provided

Procter and Gamble says Mars Incorporated has agreed to buy the IAMS, EUKANUBA, and NATURA brands for $2.9 billion in cash.

A release  says the companies expect to complete the transaction in the second half of 2014, subject to regulatory approvals.  Mars currently owns  PEDIGREE, WHISKAS, BANFIELD, and ROYAL CANIN.

Mars Petcare Global President, Todd Lachman, said: “We view the addition of the IAMS, EUKANUBA, and NATURA brands as exceptionally strategic. This acquisition is a perfect fit with our Mars Petcare vision of making  a better world for pets."

Tana Weingartner / WVXU

Demolition of the former Drawbridge Inn in Fort Mitchell begins Tuesday morning. 

A release says the sites are being cleared for future development.  Bellevue Developer Brandicorp,  is planning a mix of residential, retail and medical office use for the 20 plus acre site.

The Christ Hospital Health Network is planning a medical office building on part of the site. 

The Drawbridge Inn closed in December 2012 after operating for 42 years. 

  Science camps, sports camps, history camps, etiquette camps, and good old-fashioned get-outside-and-play camps, there are hundreds of local day and overnight programs available for kids this summer. 4C for Children Education and Outreach Coordinator Shelly Nelson, JB Woodruff, co-founder of CampFinder.co, and psychologist Stephen Gray Wallace, director of the Center for Adolescent Research and Education at Susquehanna U

Provided, ArtsWave

  Did you get to hear and enjoy any of the amazing groups that performed in town during the 2012 World Choir Games? Well, now you have the opportunity to hear more great singing, as choirs from ten local corporations, and one wild card team, compete in CincySings, an ArtsWave event.

  It has been a long, long winter, and many of us can’t wait to get out and get our yards and gardens in shape. Campbell County Horticultural Extension Agent David Koester and Peter Huttinger, neighborhood garden coordinator with the Civic Garden Center of Greater Cincinnati, share tips and advice on what to do now to give your yard and garden a solid start for the growing season.

Play Ball!

Mar 25, 2014
WVXU, Tana Weingartner

  With a seemingly never-ending winter it’s hard to believe opening day is less than a week away, but the people are more than ready for our city’s unofficial holiday and the first game of the season.

The Art of Pie

Mar 25, 2014
Provided, Teeny Lamothe

  Teeny's Tour of Pie: A Cookbook: Mastering the Art of Pie in 67 Recipes is a love letter to arguably America’s favorite dessert. In one year, blogger and would-be baker Teeny Lamothe went on a traveling apprenticeship throughout the U.S., baking under the guidance of regional experts, and now shares the real-world know-how, and recipes, these mentors taught her along the way.

Michael E. Keating

Update:

Aroldis Chapman is having surgery Thursday to insert a plate and screws above his left eye after being struck in the head by a batted ball Wednesday night, according to Rob Butcher, the Reds' director of media relations.

Chapman, the Reds' left-handed closer, was injured in a game with the Kansas City Royals, when he was struck above the left eye by a Salvador Pena line drive. Chapman had fractures above his left eye and nose.

Team physician Timothy Kremchek said Chapman suffered a mild concussion but his vision was not affected.

Rich Eiswerth

The Newport Aquarium gave a sneak peak of it's newest exhibit, Turtle Canyon, to the media today. 

provided

The Reds are calling on two former team captains to throw out the ceremonial first pitch on opening day.  In a release, the team says David Concepción and Barry Larkin will throw out simultaneous first pitches before the Reds take on the Cardinals on March 31st  at Great American Ball Park.  

Concepción was named captain in 1983 and Larkin got the title before the 1997 season.

Concepción also will serve as the grand marshal of the 95th Findlay Market Opening Day Parade, which begins at noon before the 4:10 game.

  Two separate bills calling for a state-wide smoking ban in public spaces and places of employment were introduced in this session of the Kentucky General Assembly, but the chances are slim either will even make it to the floor for a vote. If not, proponents of a smoking ban say they will try again next year. Northern Kentucky Health Department District Director Dr. Lynne Saddler, and Betsy Janes, with Smoke-Free Kentucky, discuss making Kentucky smoke free.

Michael E. Keating

This week Howard Wilkinson talks about the ongoing debate concerning when and where people can vote in Ohio.

  The United States has been waging the War on Drugs for more than 40 years, spending an estimated $1 trillion  during  that time. Many wonder if it’s time to re-think how we fight drug abuse and the criminal enterprise that surrounds and fosters it, through a system of substance regulation and control.

Provided

The Cincinnati Zoo's female giraffe, Tessa, is pregnant and due in the next few weeks. 

In a release, the zoo says  this will be Tessa's third calf.  Her last, Lulu, was born in October, 2012.  Lulu will be moving to the Wilds in Cumberland, Ohio later this spring. 

The Zoo says Tessa and father Kimba are both doing well and can be seen at the zoo.  Zoo volunteers have been watching the giraffe for signs of labor. 

Provided from Cincinnati Police Department

Long before casinos were a reality in Ohio, whenever the idea came up to make them legal, opponents would argue their presence would increase crime in and around these businesses. It’s been a year since Horseshoe Cincinnati opened, and in the fourth part of our series looking back at that year we’ve found, so far, fears of prostitution, drug activity and violent crime haven’t been realized.

provided

Allegiant Air says it will be flying non stop from Cincinnati to Tampa Bay and Myrtle Beach starting May 30th. Fares will start as low as $59 one way. 

In a release, Andrew Levy, president and C-O-O Andrew Levy  said the airline has been operating for less than a month in Cincinnati and the community has already embraced its ultra-low-cost travel offerings.

  A 25-year study involving 90,000 Canadian women aged 40 to 59 found no benefit for women who were randomly assigned to have mammograms. It found death rates from breast cancer and from all causes were the same in women who got mammograms and those who did not. The study continues the controversy over the value of mammograms in detecting cancer. Dr.

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