Maryanne Zeleznik

News Director and Morning Edition Host

In 2005, Maryanne Zeleznik came to 91.7 WVXU from WNKU where she served as News and Public Affairs Director for 20 years. At WVXU she is responsible for all news and public affairs programming, covers daily news, produces local features, regularly contributes news stories to National Public Radio, and hosts Morning Edition Monday through Friday, and Cincinnati Edition on Tuesday afternoons at 1:00 pm.

Zeleznik has won numerous regional and national journalism awards including the Leo C. Lee Award for significant contributions to public radio news from the Public Radio News Directors Incorporated, as well as awards from Ohio Associated Press, Ohio Society of Professional Journalists, and the Cincinnati Chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists.

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  Several states, including Ohio, have recently passed or are considering legislation to prevent employers from asking if a job seeker has been convicted of a felony on an initial application form. Proponents of such legislation say the question discriminates against the more than 92 million people in the United States who have an arrest record.

    A federal appeals court in Cincinnati will hear arguments Wednesday on five same-sex marriage cases that could possibly provide the foundation for a landmark opinion by the U.S. Supreme Court. The cases Wednesday involved Ohio, Kentucky, Michigan and Tennessee. Same-sex marriage has been legalized in nineteen states and the District of Columbia. WVXU'’s Ann Thompson joins us for the latest on the story.

  Skin cancer accounts for half of all cancers in the United States. Melanoma, the most serious type, will account for more than 76,000 cases of skin cancer this year. Joining us to look at skin cancer causes, treatments and research are dermatologist and assistant professor Dr. Adam Ingraffea, and professor and researcher Dr.

A new baby gorilla was born Monday morning at the Cincinnati Zoo.  “Asha”, the Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden’s eleven-year-old Western Lowland gorilla gave birth to her first baby weighing about five pounds.

Ohio Governor John Kasich has declared a state of emergency for Lucas, Wood and Fulton Counties after city of Toledo officials found evidence of an algae contaminant in the public water system and advised residents not to drink the water.

Here's information from the Governor's office:

State and local officials are working together to arrange for drinking water to be shipped into the affected areas. These are the recommendations that have been issued:

Cincinnati based  E.W. Scripps Company has agreed to merge its broadcast operations with Journal Communications and spin off and then merge their newspapers.  A release says it will create two focused and separately traded public companies that offer long-term opportunities to create value for shareholders.

The merged broadcast and digital media company, based in Cincinnati, will retain The E.W. Scripps Company name, and the Scripps family shareholders will continue to have voting control. 

Cincinnati Art Museum website

The Cincinnati Art Museum has a new Director.  Cameron Kitchin will start October 1. 

In a release, the Art Museum reports its board of directors unanimously chose Kitchin for the position.  He comes from the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art in Memphis, Tennessee where he served as director. 

  An estimated 1.7 million people sustain traumatic brain injuries each year in the United States, and more than 50,000 of those individuals die from their injuries. New research is being conducted to reduce the number of deaths and permanent disabilities caused by head trauma. Joining us to discuss one current clinical trial are University of Cincinnati College of Medicine Associate Professor of Surgery and trauma surgeon with UC Health, Dr.

  The debate over charter schools in Ohio has heated up, and several schools and the organizations that run them are currently under investigation. Proponents of charter schools point to them as an option for parents seeking schools that best suit their children. Critics say the schools siphon funding from local public school districts and that many produce poorer academic results than traditional public schools.

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