Mark Heyne

Cincinnati Edition Host

Mark Heyne hosts Cincinnati Edition Monday through Friday at 1:00 pm.

Heyne's journalism experience in Greater Cincinnati spans more than 20 years and includes positions with WLW, WHIO, WMOH and Traffic Watch/News Watch. He has received awards from the Ohio Associated Press, Ohio Society of Professional Journalists, The Press Club of Ohio, and the Cincinnati Society of Professional Journalists.

Ways To Connect

Sarah Ramsey / WVXU News

Supporters touted the potential economic benefits of casinos when the issue was placed on the ballot in 2009.  So how is Cincinnati's casino is doing so far when it comes to economic impact?

From a jobs standpoint,  the 1,700 workers at Horseshoe Cincinnati made it the largest of Ohio's four voter-approved casinos based on figures from last year.  Add to that the dollars invested in the project and you have a sizeable impact on the economy so far. 

Provided, U.S. Commercial Service

  In 2013 Ohio’s merchandise exports increased by almost 4 percent, growing to $50.5 billion, a record high for the state. The U.S. Commercial Service connects U.S. companies with international buyers, and last year facilitated nearly 15,000 export successes. Marcia Brandstadt, director of the U.S.

Like the national housing market, home sales in Cincinnati declined last month.  The Cincinnati Area Board of Realtors said closings fell a little more than 7 percent in January compared to a year earlier.  It's the first time in more than two years the local market has experienced a drop in closings.

Board president Ken Parchman compares it to the stock market.  "Our home sales activity will experience occasional dips as we continue our upward growth," he said in a statement.

Mark Heyne / WVXU News

Cincinnati Police said they've arrested 15 people and taken 11 weapons off the streets so far as part of an ongoing investigation of gang-related violence in the West End.  The effort represents four months of investigative work by various law enforcement agencies as part of the Cincinnati Initiative to Reduce Violence, also known as CIRV. 

"We want to send a loud and clear message that we do not accept homicides; we do not accept violent behavior," said Mayor John Cranley at a press briefing Thursday.

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