Mark Heyne

Reporter and Host of Cincinnati Edition & All Things Considered

Mark Heyne's journalism experience in Greater Cincinnati spans more than 20 years and includes positions with WLW, WHIO, WMOH and Traffic Watch/News Watch. He has received awards from the Ohio Associated Press, Ohio Society of Professional Journalists, The Press Club of Ohio, and the Cincinnati Society of Professional Journalists.

Heyne hosts Cincinnati Edition Wednesday afternoons at 1:00 pm and All Things Considered Monday through Friday.

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Cincinnati Edition
6:30 am
Wed March 19, 2014

Recognizing Cincinnati's Architectural Styles

Union Terminal and its Moderne Art Deco architecture

  Victorian, Art Deco, Federal, Italianate, German Gothic, Cincinnati’s downtown and surrounding neighborhoods are home to a variety of architectural styles.

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Cincinnati Edition
6:30 am
Wed March 19, 2014

Rookwood Pottery of Cincinnati

A Rookwood tile depicting Carew Tower, one Cincinnati landmark memorialized by another.
Provided, Rookwood Pottery of Cincinnati

Founded in 1880 by Maria Longworth in Cincinnati, Rookwood Pottery was soon recognized for its beautiful and distinctive pieces worldwide. In 1902 Rookwood began creating architectural pottery, and its tiles and custom designs adorned thousands of private homes and public buildings, from Carew Tower to Grand Central Station.

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Cincinnati Edition
6:30 am
Sun March 16, 2014

Health Care Enrollment Effort Rolls Into Town

Enroll America’s Countdown to #GetCovered Bus.
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Cincinnati Edition
6:30 am
Sun March 16, 2014

Combatting Human Trafficking

Human trafficking is far more a problem in the U.S. than most realize, especially for children and young women.
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Stink Bugs
3:11 pm
Fri March 14, 2014

Winter wipes out some, but not all stink bugs

Mark Heyne WVXU News

If you thought this cold, snowy winter would take care of the stink bugs that have been crawling around your house, you've probably been surprised to see the invasive pests still skulking about.

"Most of the stink bugs people are seeing walking around in their offices, in their homes, spent the winter in the buildings someplace, probably up in the attic or some protected area," said Entomologist Gene Kritsky, professor of biology at the College of Mount St. Joseph in Cincinnati.  "They're active now because it's beginning to get warm."

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