Larry Thomas

Host of The Big Screen

Larry Thomas is our resident movie reviewer and expert.

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Where, you may ask, has been director Terry Gilliam of late? He’s had a couple of misfires that never finished production, particularly his Don Quixote film. But he’s back with a new film titled The Zero Theorem, which takes him back into the realm of existential science fiction. In fact, he refers to this film as the third leg of a trilogy, which started with Brazil and continued with The Twelve Monkeys.

It’s one of my favorite movie times of the year as Cincinnati World Cinema brings you the latest edition of the British Arrow Award winning commercials. That’s right…commercials. These little mini-movies, created for television and cinema use in the UK that offer up more creativity and imagination than what we usually get on this side of the pond. After enduring yet another seemingly endless onslaught of droning prescription medicine plugs and snarky, repulsive political whines, it’s a real treat to actually enjoy watching spots that can be funny, whimsical, or even frightening without insulting your intelligence.

Larry Thomas has some thoughts about the upcoming Cincinnati Film Festival.

Movie Review: Boyhood

Aug 8, 2014

Every so often a film is released that causes both critics and audiences to become besotted with praise. Such films are compared to Citizen Kane, and are predicted to sweep the Oscars. The last time such a furor erupted it was for Paul Thomas Anderson’s The Master starring Phillip Seymour Hoffman, Amy Adams, and Joaquin Phoenix. I hated it.

Academy Award-winning actress Lee Grant (Shampoo, The Landlord, The Balcony) has written her memoir, I Said Yes to Everything, and she’s on the phone with our movie expert, Larry Thomas, for a conversation about the highlights and low points of her long career.

A really good documentary film is at its best when it chronicles the life, times and works of a truly exceptional individual. Such is the case with Life Itself, based on the autobiography of arguably the most famous film critic of all time, Roger Ebert. Oscar-nominated director Steve James, most famous for his basketball epic Hoop Dreams, was given an all access pass to Ebert during his final months before he died of cancer. It didn’t help his condition that a botched surgery left him with no lower jaw, unable to speak or eat.

The old saying goes “everything old is new again.” Except when it comes to the summer movie crop of 2014, in which all the retreads, reboots, and remakes seem like those that came before. And Dawn of the Planet of the Apes is no exception. This particular cycle of cinema began in 1968 with the original film Planet of the Apes, which spawned four sequels, two TV series, a 2001 remake from director Tim Burton which was less than well-received, then 2011’s Rise of the Planet of the Apes, which I recall was actually pretty good. Now comes the 2014 Dawn of the Planet of the Apes, which is pretty much a casserole of plot points, social commentary, and high-tech action scenes in yet another effort to mine bags of box office coin from a proven commodity.

If you’re tired of the sci-fi genre being hijacked just so Tom Cruise can make another movie, or director Michael Bay can churn out another overlong, turgid Transformers epic, then there’s a new film you should flock to immediately. It’s called Snowpiercer and it’s not playing everywhere, so you’ll have to seek it out.

Larry Thomas recounts the careers of four actresses - Lana Turner, Jayne Mansfield, Katharine Hepburn, and Rosemary Clooney – who, besides being exceptionally talented, have a very strange connection: they all died on June 29 (in different years.)

Once again it’s summertime, and the living is… well, in many instances… mobile. What with enjoying the seasonal events and travels, and the upcoming weekend of big racing at the Kentucky Speedway, I started thinking about the symmetry between two of Americas great loves: cars and movies.