Karen Kasler

Contact Karen at 614/578-6375 or at kkasler@statehousenews.org.

Karen Kasler is a lifelong Ohioan. She grew up in Lancaster, attended Otterbein College in Westerville, and found her first professional break at WCBE-FM, Columbus. Karen was selected as a Fellow in the Kiplinger Program for Mid-Career Journalists at The Ohio State University in 1994. After earning her Master's Degree in that program, she worked at WBNS-TV in Columbus and then moved north to become the afternoon drive anchor/assignment editor for WTAM-AM, Cleveland. Karen followed the demolition and rebuilding of Cleveland Browns Stadium, produced award-winning series on identity theft and the Y2K panic, covered the Republican National Convention in 2000 and the blackout of 2003, and reported annually from the Cleveland National Air Show each year, often going upside down in an aerobatic plane to do it. In 1999, she was a media witness to the execution of Wilford Berry, at the time the first man put to death since Ohio re-instated capital punishment. Karen frequently reported for ABC Radio News, and also co-produced an award-winning nationally-distributed documentary on the one-year anniversary of September 11, 2001, which featured her interview with Homeland Security Secretary Tom Ridge from the West Wing of the White House.

Since returning to Columbus, she's covered major elections and the controversies surrounding them. Each year she anchors the Bureau's live coverage of the governor's State of the State. She was a moderator for US Senate debates in 2012 and 2010, participated in several debates in 2010, and has led debates over statewide issues. She's produced features for NPR and "Marketplace", and has been interviewed by NPR, the BBC, NBC and several local and regional stations around the country. She's a regular panelist on WCPN/ideastream's "The Sound of Ideas", a frequent guest on WOSU-TV’s “Columbus on the Record” and has appeared on WBNS-TV's "Face the State".

She's been honored by the Association of Capitol Editors and Reporters, the Cleveland Press Club/Society of Professional Journalists, the Ohio Educational Telecommunications Commission, and holds a National Headliner Award. She's won several awards from the Ohio AP, and is a four-time winner of the AP's Best Broadcast Writing award. She's a three-time Emmy nominee for "The State of Ohio". She's a past president of the Ohio Associated Press, and currently on the Board of Directors for the Central Ohio Society of Professional Journalists. Karen is also a former adjunct professor at Capital University in Columbus.

Karen, her husband and their son Jack live on Columbus' northeast side.

It turns out Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton may have won one more county in Ohio than originally reported.

Now that the election is over, lawmakers will be coming back to work at the Statehouse for the lame duck session. But the presidential race is likely to come up in what they discuss.

All the statewide races on this month’s ballot were decided by fairly big margins, except one. But the contest between Ohio Supreme Court justice between Republican appeals court judge Pat Fischer of Cincinnati and Democratic Cuyahoga County Common pleas judge John O’Donnell is now over.

This election has emboldened supporters of Donald Trump, and left Hillary Clinton’s backers devastated. But it’s also brought up big questions for those who align themselves with the major political parties. Two former party chairs took time recently to talk about what the results of this election mean for the future.

A documentary filmmaker opened a pop-up chicken restaurant in Columbus this weekend that claims to feature “fast food with integrity”. It’ll be open for two more days, to get customer feedback. But it’s unclear whether it is what it seems.

Mayors from Ohio’s 30 largest cities have formed a coalition to discuss state policy and lobby lawmakers about the issues their communities are facing.

Youngstown-area Rep. Tim Ryan says he’ll challenge Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi for the job of leading Democrats in Congress. And the idea is going over well with one Democratic leader.

The state takes in $1.7 billion from out of state online retailers paying the commercial activity tax, or CAT. Now the state’s highest court says internet retailers which have no offices or employees in Ohio but sell products to Ohio residents still have to pay the CAT, which nearly all Ohio businesses pay.

For the second time in as many years, Ohio plans to change the way it puts condemned killers to death, because the state has been unable to find the lethal injection drug it had wanted to use.

A panel of state lawmakers delayed a new process by which charter school sponsors would be evaluated under a law passed last year. But the state department of education says it’s determined to go forward with those evaluations next month, using an old process it says will be just as tough.

There may be no week in which Ohioans can register and cast ballots at the same time, if a ruling from a panel of three federal judges shortening Ohio’s early voting period holds up.

The Statehouse is often used as a gathering place for people with a variety of viewpoints and representing many causes – even if they seem to have nothing to do with Ohio government.

The first Quinnipiac poll featuring people who are likely to vote is out – and it shows good news for one of the two major party presidential candidates. But there’s also important information for the leading minor party candidates too.

Protests at the DNC have been loud and disruptive at times, but as in Cleveland, they've been peaceful.

Supporters of Bernie Sanders have been blasting the role that the 715 superdelegates have played in this presidential campaign, since they aren’t pledged to either Sanders or Hillary Clinton. And there will be a measure that will be voted on during the first day of the convention.

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