Jo Ingles

Jo Ingles is a professional journalist who covers politics and Ohio government for the Ohio Public Radio and Television for the Ohio Public Radio and Television Statehouse News Bureau. She reports on issues of importance to Ohioans including education, legislation, politics, and life and death issues such as capital punishment.

After working for more than a decade at WOSU-AM, Jo was hired by the Ohio Public Radio/TV News Bureau in 1999. Her work has been featured on national networks such as National Public Radio, Marketplace, the Great Lakes Radio Consortium and the BBC. She is often a guest on radio talk shows heard on Ohio’s public radio stations. In addition, she’s a regular guest on WOSU-TV’s “Columbus on the Record” and ONN’s “Capitol Square”. Jo also writes for respected publications such as Columbus Monthly and the Reuters News Service.

She has won many awards for her work across all of those platforms. She is currently the president of the Ohio Radio and TV Correspondent’s Association, a board member for the Ohio Legislative Correspondent’s Association and a board member for the Ohio Associated Press Broadcasters. Jo also works as the Media Adviser for the Ohio Wesleyan University Transcript newspaper and OWU radio.

State lawmakers are once again considering changing regulations on cosmetologists, after eliminating a manager’s license last year. Now, there’s a bill that would reduce the amount of training needed to get a cosmetology license while focusing on developing apprenticeships instead. 

Ohio’s top law enforcement official will serve as co-chair for a campaign to pass Issue 1, a proposed constitutional amendment for crime victims on the statewide ballot this fall. 

Gov. John Kasich has formally signed what’s become known as “Judy’s Law.” It is legislation named for a Columbus woman that imposes longer prison sentences on attackers who intentionally disfigure their victims by using accelerants to set them on fire.  And this law might not be the last to crack down on domestic violence.

It appears the state’s new medical marijuana bill has cleared a hurdle. A public university has stepped forward to volunteer to serve as the state’s medical marijuana testing laboratory. 

After joining the House in voting to override six of Gov. John Kasich’s budget vetoes last month, the state Senate was expected to come back this week to consider overriding more. But the Senate has canceled its planned session. 

There’s a new scam that is prompting Ohioans to give personal information, thinking they are providing it to the health department. But that’s not the case.

A new bipartisan health care reform proposal meant to stabilize the Affordable Care Act urges President Trump and Congressional leaders to take immediate action. The plan put forth by Republican Ohio Governor John Kasich and Colorado’s Democratic Governor, John Hickenlooper, is drawing praise from some other governors too. 

A nationally syndicated tabloid talk show host whose roots are in Ohio could be entering the race for Governor next year. Jerry Springer has talked about politics before but there are now signs that he is seriously considering jumping into the race. 

If you need to fill up your car, you had better do it soon. Gas prices in Ohio are ready to spike up because of flooding caused by what was Hurricane Harvey in Texas.

With the school year starting and many controversial issues on the left and the right to discuss, debate and protest, people have been talking a lot about free speech on college campuses. Two conservative Republican state lawmakers have come up with a new bill that they say will ensure all points of view are represented at Ohio’s public universities. 

Rising sales of booze in the Buckeye State are leaving the state agency that oversees liquor thirsting for more operators. 

When elected office holders run a campaign, they are required by law to keep their campaign staff and messages separate from their official communications. Elected officials who are running for governor next year are handling their social media in different ways – some creating totally new accounts, but some aren’t separating them at all. 

The last county in the nation that didn’t have a private insurance company to choose from on the Affordable Care Act exchange was in Ohio. But now people in that northwest Ohio county have an option. 

A Monumental Debate

Aug 24, 2017

Just last year, Ohio replaced one of the two statues representing the state in Congress’ Statuary Hall because of its subject’s views on slavery. The statue of Gov. William Allen, who served from 1874 to 1876, was replaced with one of Thomas Edison. But what happened to the Allen statue? That question is especially relevant now that monuments to historical people whose views are now considered controversial have been the focus of debate and even vandalism. 


The number of children in Ohio who are placed in foster care continues to increase as the opioid crisis worsens. There’s a shortage of foster care families to meet the need.

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