Jim Nolan

Interactive Communications Manager, Host of Local Exposure

Jim is a Northern Kentucky native and a father of three. In his spare time, Jim likes to read, play ice hockey and watch foreign films. He currently resides with his family on the East side of town.

Ways To Connect

Photo by Marek Hofman
http://www.bbc.com/

In honor of Jack Bruce, bass player for the legendary band Cream, who passed away last weekend, we will air a special episode of Jazz with OT, recorded in 1974, that features some of Cream's most memorable tunes.

Max Brooks, son of movie legend Mel Brooks, is the author of the book World War Z (which became a Brad Pitt movie) and is the mind behind an original horror series of comic books and a new subgenre of fiction: zombies vs. vampires with The Extinction Parade. He spends a few minutes talking with our Jim Nolan about this latest foray into sci-fi.

Tyler Shields is an exciting young photographer, director and writer from Los Angeles whose work is humorous, super-sexy, thought-provoking and often contains a biting critique on today's consumer-culture.

When I reviewed Sleeve's album Sex Is Stupid back in May, I wondered if they might turn out to be some kind of a one-off band and if I might never hear from them again.

How glad I am to be wrong - again.

Gorilla Cinema gives a new meaning to the traditional idea of dinner & a movie.

Jacob Trevino and Martha Tiffany are not just film fanatics. Jacob is a professional mixologist and Martha a professional Sous Chef. Together they created Gorilla Cinema with the intention of blending their knowledge of food and drink with their passion for the silver screen to craft a wonderfully delicious, unique and whimsical movie-going experience.

Something magical happens for me whenever I get around Lexington, KY. I find myself in a place that is not quite The South but it is certainly no longer The North. It is a land in-between, like the gloaming. It's Narnia, it's Middle Earth. It's a dream-like place where I begin to feel like I'm not so tightly anchored to the real world anymore.

How perfect it is then that a band like Bear Medicine calls Lexington their home? The band's first full-length album, The Moon Has Been All My Life, which was recorded by Otto Helmuth at Nitro Sonic Studios, absolutely shimmers with a shamanic, mystical energy. The ten songs on the album transport you and transform your general outlook. In terms of musicianship, Bear Medicine might be Lexington's answer to Cincinnati bands like Buffalo Killers or The Ridges.

With a lonely baritone ukulele, a voice that is lilting and endearing and a notebook full of delectable poetry, Nancy Paraskevopoulos has recorded a collection of beautifully quirky and charming songs and wrapped them up into a tasty nugget of an album that she calls Comfort Muffin, released earlier this year on Chow Records.

The seminal Irish rock band, Black 47, are calling it quits after 15 albums and 25 years.  As part of their farewell tour in support of their last two albums Last Call and Rise Up, the band will be performing this Thursday at The Irish Heritage Center of Greater Cincinnati

Photo by Nikki Murray (buttershug.com)

So many bands today seem to rely on a gimmick in order to get attention. It might be outrageous costumes, on-stage antics... or maybe it's the incorporation of some strange and obscure 18th century musical instrument; but it seems like almost everybody needs their 'hook' if they want to be noticed in today's media-saturated world.

Then, every once in a while, you run across an artist like Royal Holland. Holland cuts through the sonic clutter with a razor-sharp acoustic guitar and purely superlative songwriting.

Earlier this month, he released his 5-track EP entitled Volume One - The Maze at Northside Tavern. Described as 'dreamy, smooth synth-folk songs about love and loss,' Holland's music is transportive and multi-faceted. He can weave tunes that evoke feelings of calm reflection ("Twin Rivers") and palpable tension ("The Maze"); or he can write energetic melodies that make you want to stand up and clap along ("Devil's Night").

Alive Inside is described as "a joyous cinematic exploration of music’s capacity to reawaken our souls and uncover the deepest parts of our humanity." The film was awarded the Audience Award for US Documentary at the 2014 Sundance Film Festival. Special screening events are coming to the Kenwood and Mariemont Theatres and feature special Q&A sessions with the filmmakers.

Cincinnati-born filmmaker Michael Rossato-Bennett chronicles the experiences of individuals around the U.S. who have been revitalized through the simple experience of listening to music. His camera reveals the uniquely human connection we find in music and how its healing power can triumph where prescription medication falls short. 

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