Jim Nolan

Interactive Communications Manager, Host of Local Exposure

Jim is a Northern Kentucky native and a father of three. In his spare time, Jim likes to read, play ice hockey and watch foreign films. He currently resides with his family on the East side of town.

Ways To Connect

ATTENTION LOCAL BANDS:
If you have a song, a desk and a camera then please read this:

Have you ever wanted to play a Tiny Desk Concert? Now's your chance: NPR Music and Lagunitas Brewing Company are holding a contest, and the winner gets to perform at the famous tiny desk at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C. 

Photo by Christopher Vercheak

Grab your favorite tattered flannel and strap on your 10-hole steel-toed Doc Martens, because Subsets are bringing back the eighties with their new album twothousandfourteen.

For sixteen and a half minutes, every note of twothousandfourteen is a relentless assault of viking fury, packaged to sound like the best of underground bands from labels like SST and Epitaph Records.

Ohio Knife always gives you more than you expect, yet you still want seconds. If there is a real-life personification of the "this one goes to eleven" mentality, you can find it in this Cincinnati band made up of Scotty Wood [bass], Andrew Higley [keyboards], Joe Suer [drums] and Jason Snell [guitar, vocals].

Everything about Ohio Knife is big, bold, loud and full of serious in-your-face attitude. The same can be said for everything about their latest release Our Neighborhood.

Cincinnati's favorite bearded, bohemian brethren, Buffalo Killers are back and are producing cool rocking music at a speed that would made Bob Pollard blush.

Their newest release from Sun Pedal Recordings is called Fireball of Sulk and is a 6-track bookend-like follow-up to their album Heavy Reverie which just came out this past Spring.

Smut: P U R S E

Nov 11, 2014

I'd like you to take a moment and think of your record collection and pick out your two favorite albums. Now, take your favorite sounds from those two albums.

I don't mean think of your favorite songs, but rather, just take an assortment of those uniquely sublime moments that put a hook in your brain and make you think, "Yeah, this is MY music." Try to distill all of that down into something that represents the very essence of the kind of music that speaks to you as an individual on an intimate, almost personal level. Now collect all of those little bits and pieces and mash them together in some kind of mental particle collider.

If you had my brain, the resulting fusion would probably sound an awful lot like PURSE, the new album from Cincinnati band Smut.

facebook.com/daycampband

Sometimes this gig is just freaking awesome.

Back in January of this year, I was turned on to a local act that quickly became one of my favorites - Day Camp. Their throwback 1990's sound takes what's best about Pixies, Lemonheads and TMBG and mixes it with their own sardonic and cynical lyricism as well as tremendously groovy rhythms.

JetLab: JetLab

Oct 28, 2014
facebook.com/JetLabmusic

JetLab strikes me more as a project than a band. It is a giant, musical crucible where rules don't seem to apply and nothing is excluded - and the general rule of JetLab is "go ahead and throw it in and let's see what comes out." But what else would expect from band that started out as a bet?

Photo by Marek Hofman
http://www.bbc.com/

In honor of Jack Bruce, bass player for the legendary band Cream, who passed away last weekend, we will air a special episode of Jazz with OT, recorded in 1974, that features some of Cream's most memorable tunes.

Max Brooks, son of movie legend Mel Brooks, is the author of the book World War Z (which became a Brad Pitt movie) and is the mind behind an original horror series of comic books and a new subgenre of fiction: zombies vs. vampires with The Extinction Parade. He spends a few minutes talking with our Jim Nolan about this latest foray into sci-fi.

Tyler Shields is an exciting young photographer, director and writer from Los Angeles whose work is humorous, super-sexy, thought-provoking and often contains a biting critique on today's consumer-culture.

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