Jay Hanselman

Reporter

Jay Hanselman brings more than 10 years experience as a news anchor and reporter to 91.7 WVXU. He came to WVXU from WNKU, where he hosted the local broadcast of All Things Considered.  Hanselman has been recognized for his reporting by the Kentucky AP Broadcasters Association, the Ohio Society of Professional Journalists, and the Ohio AP Broadcasters.

Hanselman covers Cincinnati City Hall for WVXU.

Ways To Connect

Provided

A current Cincinnati assistant police chief is leaving the department to be the director of security at the new downtown casino.

Horseshoe Cincinnati announced Thursday in a press release Richard Janke will start the new job on Sept. 10th.

“Richard’s law enforcement experience, in-depth understanding of Cincinnati and his commitment to the vitality and safety of downtown makes him a great addition to our team,” said casino General Manager Kevin Kline in a written statement. 

Kearney proposes debit cards for tax refunds

Aug 22, 2012
Provided

A state senator from Cincinnati is introducing a bill that would let taxpayers get their income tax refund on a prepaid debit card. 

Sen. Eric Kearney said the state needs to adjust to the marketplace.

“This prepaid debit card program will benefit those citizens that do not have a bank account for direct deposit, or for those who wish to avoid the hassle with paper checks and check cashing fees,” Kearney said in a statement.  “They will also be able to use their prepaid debit cards in stores, online, over the phone, or anywhere that accepts debit cards.”

Jay Hanselman takes an in-depth look at one of the week's top stories.

Jay Hanselman takes a look back at some of the week's top stories.

Provided

Cincinnati's new downtown casino is expected to open next spring, and it will begin recruiting for its first positions next week.

Jay Hanselman reviews some of the stories that made news in Greater Cincinnati this past week, including City Council term limits, relocating utilities for the streetcar project, and levies for Hamilton County Senior and Mental Health Services.

Provided from City of Cincinnati

Cincinnati officials are studying a plan to make it quieter for some residents who live in neighborhoods with a lot of train traffic.

Train engineers are required to blow their horns one-quarter mile before each roadway crossing. 

It’s the same pattern each time, two long blasts, followed by a short and then another long one. 

Since sound travels, some residents hear it a lot especially when there are several crossings located close together. 

By Jay Hanselman

Construction on Cincinnati's newest fire station is already underway in Westwood.  A groundbreaking ceremony was held Thursday. 

Officials say it will improve public safety and residents say they hope it will spur other economic development.

The new Station 35 will sit on Harrison Avenue near the intersection of McHenry. 

The 18,000 square foot facility will have 4 bays for equipment and will replace the 105-year-old location about a mile and a half away. 

Pages