Jay Hanselman

Reporter

Jay Hanselman brings more than 10 years experience as a news anchor and reporter to 91.7 WVXU. He came to WVXU from WNKU, where he hosted the local broadcast of All Things Considered.  Hanselman has been recognized for his reporting by the Kentucky AP Broadcasters Association, the Ohio Society of Professional Journalists, and the Ohio AP Broadcasters.

Hanselman covers Cincinnati City Hall for WVXU.

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Tana Weingartner

Cincinnati voters Tuesday narrowly approved a charter amendment that will change city council members

terms in office from the current two-years to four.

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Cincinnati Council will likely vote Wednesday on a plan to block three streets in the Oakley neighborhood as it deals with increasing traffic problems from the Rookwood Exchange development in Norwood.  

The plan would affect Hyde Park, Atlantic and Arbor Avenues if the city's fire department doesn't object to the closures.  

Resident Craig Rozen supports the action.

Provided

Horseshoe Casino Cincinnati announced Friday it’s now ready to hire an additional 400 workers.

This is the second phase of its recruiting initiatives as the casino prepares for a 1,700 member workforce for an opening in the spring 2013.

Casino officials said candidates are currently being sought for several roles in accounting, finance, facilities, slots, and security.  The facility is also seeking about a dozen culinary positions including accomplished chefs, sous chefs and restaurant managers.

The Week in Review

Nov 2, 2012

WVXU's Jay Hanselman has a look at some of the week's top stories.

From Towne Properties website

Three Cincinnati Council Members are asking city administrators to investigate pay issues involving some workers at the USquare Development near the University of Cincinnati. 

They allege some sub-contractors aren't paying their employees the correct hourly wages.

Tana Weingartner

Cincinnati residents will vote next week on a charter amendment that would allow city council members to serve four-year terms instead of the current two.  

Both sides have been debating the issue since a council majority placed it on the ballot in August.  

The group Citizens for Common Sense is urging a “yes” vote and held a press conference Tuesday.  

Business owner and philanthropist Otto Budig supports longer-terms.

The Greater Cincinnati Port Authority is working to finalize a strategic plan that will guide its work for the next two years. 

Executive Director Laura Brunner presented the proposal Tuesday to City Council’s Strategic Growth Committee. 

She said some may be surprised the plan is only for two years instead of a longer period.

Cincinnati Council will likely vote next week to borrow $37 million to fund economic development projects in the city and to cover a portion of the costs of the Homeless to Homes plan. 

The Department of Housing and Urban Development would loan the money and the city's Community Development Block Grants would be the collateral. 

The portion for Homeless to Homes to relocate three shelters is generating some concern. 

Alice Shirtz is with Affordable Housing Advocates and opposes the proposal.

Michael Keating

WVXU's Howard Wilkinson talks about this week's political headlines with Jay Hanselman.

The Week in Review

Oct 26, 2012

WVXU's Jay Hanselman takes a look at some of the week's top stories.

Cincinnati voters will decide next month if they want city council members to serve a four-year term in office instead of the current two. 

One group is urging a “no” vote on Issue Four. 

Former Council Member Chris Bortz dismissed the notion the group can’t get an serious work done in two-years.

Cincinnati Council will vote Wednesday on more than $13 million of funding assistance for two economic development projects in Over The Rhine. 

The Budget and Finance Committee approved the items Tuesday.

3CDC is seeking help for the continuing work on Mercer Commons and Gateway V.  Both developments include housing and retail space.

Council Member Chris Seelbach cast a no vote on a portion of the funding because of the process.

Channel 9 (WCPO)

The final pieces are falling into place for a plan to return a grocery store to the Clifton community. 

That Cincinnati neighborhood has been without a market since an IGA on Ludlow Avenue closed in January 2011. 

Another operator has been working on financing to renovate and re-open the facility. 

City Council's Budget and Finance committee Tuesday approved a tax abatement for the project. 

Resident Beth Whalen asked the full Council to support the effort.

Cincinnati leaders could be providing nearly $8.5 million to the Port of Greater Cincinnati Development Authority to assist with an economic development project in Bond Hill. 

The group has an agreement to buy the former Jordan Crossing complex at Reading and Seymour Roads and turn it into a mixed use development. 

Laura Brunner with the Port said the process is starting with a study.

A city attorney said officials are working to aggressively enforce a tougher chronic nuisance ordinance Council approved last year. 

Mark Manning started in March and works in the District One police headquarters. 

He spoke to a Council committee last week. 

A property is declared a chronic nuisance once crime and disorder there reaches a certain level.  The goal is to hold the owner responsible for those problems. 

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