Jay Hanselman

Reporter

Jay Hanselman brings more than 10 years experience as a news anchor and reporter to 91.7 WVXU. He came to WVXU from WNKU, where he hosted the local broadcast of All Things Considered.  Hanselman has been recognized for his reporting by the Kentucky AP Broadcasters Association, the Ohio Society of Professional Journalists, and the Ohio AP Broadcasters.

Hanselman covers Cincinnati City Hall for WVXU.

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A task force continues its work reviewing the Cincinnati charter, which outlines how the city is governed.  

Group members heard Thursday from the subcommittee set up to review the balance of power between the mayor and council.  

Member Alex Linser said one item that needs reviewed is what is called the mayor's “pocket veto.”

“The mayor has complete control over the legislative agenda on Council,” Linser said.  “So he decides unilaterally what gets to Council and what does not, which gives him effective control over the entire legislative process.”

Tana Weingartner / WVXU

Cincinnati City Manager Harry Black is changing the way the city purchases goods and services.  

Starting March 23 all contracts, bids or requests for proposals of $50,000 or more will have to come to his office for review and approval.  

Black said the goal is to streamline and centralize the procurement process.  He said right now city departments have different methods for buying goods and services.

A Cincinnati Council committee could vote in two weeks on a plan to set up a residential parking permit program in parts of the Over-the-Rhine.  

Legislation to enact the proposal could be ready by the end of this week for the Neighborhoods Committee to consider.  

The area for the program would be bounded by Central Parkway on the west and south; Sycamore on the east and Liberty on the north.  

Transportation and Engineering Director Michael Moore said some residents want to know why it does not go north of Liberty.

Provided/City of Cincinnati

Cincinnati Council could vote in a few weeks on a proposal that would let the city do a better job with litter and weed enforcement in the city's neighborhoods.  

Mayor John Cranley announced the plan Friday in Price Hill after a task force spent several months developing it.

After months of debate, Cincinnati Council gave final approval Wednesday to a compromise ordinance targeting people who let their dangerous or vicious dogs run loose in the city.  The proposal includes tougher fines for owners, but it does not have any criminal sanctions such as jail time.

Council has been debating the city's dog laws after a six-year-old girl was severely injured in a dog attack last summer.

 Council Member Kevin Flynn said the goal is to correct the bad behavior of the owner.

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