Jay Hanselman

Reporter

Jay Hanselman brings more than 10 years experience as a news anchor and reporter to 91.7 WVXU. He came to WVXU from WNKU, where he hosted the local broadcast of All Things Considered.  Hanselman has been recognized for his reporting by the Kentucky AP Broadcasters Association, the Ohio Society of Professional Journalists, and the Ohio AP Broadcasters.

Hanselman covers Cincinnati City Hall for WVXU.

Ways To Connect

Tana Weingartner / WVXU

Cincinnati's Public Services director calls potholes a rite of spring.  Now the city is gearing up to repair 10,000 of them in the next three weeks.  

Gerald Checco told a council committee Tuesday the department needs help from the public.

"As you know, we do not have inspectors roaming around and making surveys of streets," Checco said.  "We depend on our citizens and our elected officials and our people to tell us where the potholes are."

A city release lists several ways for residents to report potholes:

Cincinnati Parks / www.cincinnatiparks.com

Two Cincinnati council members say they have a funding plan to renovate a Mt. Auburn park and improve pedestrian access along Auburn Avenue.  

Charlie Winburn and Chris Seelbach introduced a motion Monday to invest $9 million during the next two years for the projects.  

Seelbach said the city's investment will bring an additional $100 million in private investment nearby.

Tana Weingartner / WVXU

Members of Cincinnati Council's Law and Public Safety Committee are promising action to improve the allegedly poor living conditions at a Walnut Hills apartment complex.

The city has filed a lawsuit against the owners of The Alms Hill Apartments on Victory Parkway.  It comes after inspections revealed several issues including mold, roaches, bedbugs and water damage from leaks.

The city issued 29 pages of orders that need correcting. 

Josette Bonner lives in the building and says she doesn't feel safe or healthy there.

A task force continues its work reviewing the Cincinnati charter, which outlines how the city is governed.  

Group members heard Thursday from the subcommittee set up to review the balance of power between the mayor and council.  

Member Alex Linser said one item that needs reviewed is what is called the mayor's “pocket veto.”

“The mayor has complete control over the legislative agenda on Council,” Linser said.  “So he decides unilaterally what gets to Council and what does not, which gives him effective control over the entire legislative process.”

Tana Weingartner / WVXU

Cincinnati City Manager Harry Black is changing the way the city purchases goods and services.  

Starting March 23 all contracts, bids or requests for proposals of $50,000 or more will have to come to his office for review and approval.  

Black said the goal is to streamline and centralize the procurement process.  He said right now city departments have different methods for buying goods and services.

A Cincinnati Council committee could vote in two weeks on a plan to set up a residential parking permit program in parts of the Over-the-Rhine.  

Legislation to enact the proposal could be ready by the end of this week for the Neighborhoods Committee to consider.  

The area for the program would be bounded by Central Parkway on the west and south; Sycamore on the east and Liberty on the north.  

Transportation and Engineering Director Michael Moore said some residents want to know why it does not go north of Liberty.

Provided/City of Cincinnati

Cincinnati Council could vote in a few weeks on a proposal that would let the city do a better job with litter and weed enforcement in the city's neighborhoods.  

Mayor John Cranley announced the plan Friday in Price Hill after a task force spent several months developing it.

After months of debate, Cincinnati Council gave final approval Wednesday to a compromise ordinance targeting people who let their dangerous or vicious dogs run loose in the city.  The proposal includes tougher fines for owners, but it does not have any criminal sanctions such as jail time.

Council has been debating the city's dog laws after a six-year-old girl was severely injured in a dog attack last summer.

 Council Member Kevin Flynn said the goal is to correct the bad behavior of the owner.

UPDATE:  Council may now in fact vote on the dog ordinance Wednesday.  Mayor's spokesperson said if the city's Law Department can make some last minute changes in time, will happen today.

Original post: The full Cincinnati Council will likely not vote on an ordinance Wednesday to crackdown on people who do not control their dangerous or vicious dogs.  The Law and Public Safety Committee approved a compromise proposal Monday.  

Provided / SORTA

Construction work continues on the first phase of the Cincinnati streetcar project despite lots of snow and cold temperatures.  Crews once again plan to work on track at a busy downtown intersection this weekend. 

Project executive John Deatrick said that construction has been delayed twice because of the weather.

“The rail will start Friday night at 7 p.m., Fifth Street will be closed because we can’t put the rail down half at a time in the intersection,” Deatrick said.  “We have to do the whole intersection at one go.”

Pages