Jay Hanselman

Reporter

Jay Hanselman brings more than 10 years experience as a news anchor and reporter to 91.7 WVXU. He came to WVXU from WNKU, where he hosted the local broadcast of All Things Considered.  Hanselman has been recognized for his reporting by the Kentucky AP Broadcasters Association, the Ohio Society of Professional Journalists, and the Ohio AP Broadcasters.

Hanselman covers Cincinnati City Hall for WVXU.

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Bill Rinehart / WVXU

Cincinnati's Historic Conservation board has decided the current owners of the former Dennison Hotel cannot tear it down.  

The board voted 3-2 Thursday to deny a certificate of appropriateness to demolish the building.

Sarah Ramsey

A Cincinnati council committee learned more Tuesday about the recent report on the Metropolitan Sewer District.  

Much of the information was shared when the document was released last week.  

The Greater Cincinnati Water Works has sent out 1,543 test kits so residents can check the lead level in their drinking water. So far, 853 have been analyzed and 21 properties have levels that are concerning.  

Cincinnati Council Member Charlie Winburn has introduced the first set of motions making changes to the budget plan submitted by Mayor John Cranley and City Manager Harry Black.

incinnati council members will now have several days to write motions to make their proposed changes to the city’s fiscal year budget, which will take effect July 1.

 

Some on council will use the comments they heard from residents during three public hearings to make those alterations to the proposed spending plan.

 

Sarah Ramsey / WVXU

A newly released audit suggests Cincinnati officials need to further investigate some of the past practices of the former management of the Metropolitan Sewer District.

The audit reports 34 recommendations for changes.

Cincinnati residents have one last chance Tuesday night to comment on the city's proposed budget for the fiscal year, which is set to begin July 1st.

City Council's Budget and Finance Committee is holding a final public hearing beginning at six o'clock at the College Hill Recreation Center, located at 5545 Belmont Avenue.

Cincinnati officials are continuing work to update the economic incentives used to get companies to locate or expand in the city.  An outside consultant has spent nearly a year reviewing those policies and has provided city leaders with a more than 150 page report.

An overflow crowd filled a small room at the Oakley Recreation Center Thursday night for the first of three public hearings on Cincinnati's proposed budget for the new fiscal year.  

About 30 people offered comments on the spending plan during the two-hour long hearing.

Sarah Ramsey / WVXU

An online Enquirer report Thursday questioned whether the ongoing audit of the Metropolitan Sewer District is truly independent.  It questions if the city manager and city solicitor are playing too big a role in the review.

Some Cincinnati Council members are still asking that audits of the Metropolitan Sewer District and the city's parks department be released before votes on the budget later this month.

It appears Cincinnati Council's decision to increase human services funding by $3 million last year is making a difference.  The funds are distributed to 34 programs focused on preventing homelessness and increasing gainful employment.   

Bill Rinehart / WVXU

Cincinnati's Historic Conservation Board has continued a hearing on whether the former Dennison Hotel on Main Street in Downtown can be demolished.  

A vote will come at another hearing, which has not been scheduled.  

Bill Rinehart

Cincinnati Council did not have enough votes Wednesday for a motion asking for a "solution" to make parts of the Central Parkway protected bike lanes safer for drivers and cyclists.  

Council Member Christopher Smitherman's plan had four yes votes and three no votes.  Council rules say an issue needs five votes to be approved.  

Jay Hanselman / WVXU

Cincinnati Mayor John Cranley said Wednesday his proposed budget revisions will include $12 million to buy the former Wasson Way line from Norfolk Southern.  That would allow the city to continue with plans for a bike/hike trail to connect several city neighborhoods.

The city reached an agreement with the railroad last year to purchase about 4.1 miles of Wasson Way for $11,757,000.  That deal expires on July 31, 2016, unless the city pays to extend the purchase option.  Cranley's plan means the transaction should be completed this summer.

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