Jay Hanselman

Reporter

Jay Hanselman brings more than 10 years experience as a news anchor and reporter to 91.7 WVXU. He came to WVXU from WNKU, where he hosted the local broadcast of All Things Considered.  Hanselman has been recognized for his reporting by the Kentucky AP Broadcasters Association, the Ohio Society of Professional Journalists, and the Ohio AP Broadcasters.

Hanselman covers Cincinnati City Hall for WVXU.

Ways To Connect

Tana Weingartner / WVXU

Police officers from across the region were in Downtown Monday honoring their fallen colleagues as part of National Police Week.

City of Cincinnati

Cincinnati Council could vote Wednesday to apply for up to $29 million in federal money to fund the Wasson Way Commuter Trail Network.  

It is a proposed shared-use path for bikes and pedestrians along an unused rail line running through several eastside city neighborhoods. 

Tana Weingartner / WVXU

Cincinnati's city manager grew up in Baltimore and served as that city's finance director before relocating here.  Harry Black says it saddens him to see what's happening in his hometown.

And Black says Baltimore will have a chance to improve police-community relationships much like Cincinnati did following the 2001 riots.

Ann Thompson / WVXU

The head of Cincinnati's police union says the number of officers working in the city's police districts is bare bones.

Ann Thompson / WVXU

Cincinnati and Hamilton County officials are always talking about ways to share services.  But it appears the city may be ready to "unshare" one service.  

Cincinnati Council is being asked to approve an ordinance dropping the city's membership in the Hamilton County Storm Water District. 

Sarah Ramsey

A Cincinnati Council committee will have two proposals to consider for bringing residential parking permits to portions of Over-the-Rhine.  

City administrators had a plan ready to be implemented.  But Council rejected it last month and the rules say it cannot come back without being changed.  

Mayor John Cranley has an OTR parking proposal without a specific fee for the permits.

Provided / SORTA

The latest controversy with the Cincinnati streetcar project involves what happens to special events along the Downtown and Over-the-Rhine route.  

A report from WCPO Digital Wednesday said a city memo from last year indicated “no special event will be permitted to halt, close, delay or otherwise disrupt streetcar service.”  

Jay Hanselman

By the end of the month, Cincinnati Council will likely have spent the $40,000 in the city’s closed captioning budget for the fiscal year.

The closed captioning is displayed on the CitiCable channel.  It is also shown in the Council chamber to aid the hearing impaired.

So far this fiscal year (starting July 1, 2014), the city has spent $35,666 for captioning service.  That leaves just about $4,300 left to cover April, May and June.  Current trends suggest that money will be gone when the April invoice arrives early next month.

Cincinnati recently changed some parking meter rates in parts of Downtown and Over-the-Rhine.  
 

It is part of a contract with the Xerox Company to help analyze the city's parking assets.  City officials are reviewing that data and using it to price meters.  

Community and Economic Development Director Oscar Bedolla said smartphone technology is coming soon.

Provided / SORTA

Cincinnati officials could be looking to plug about a $500,000 hole in the streetcar operating budget.  

The Southwest Ohio Regional Transit Authority, which will run the system, now estimates fare revenues will be about $675,000 a year.  That is less than an earlier estimate of $1 million.  
 

Part of the reduction could be in how fares are charged.  SORTA is planning for $1 for a two-hour pass.  Earlier studies were based on $1 per trip.

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