Howard Wilkinson

Reporter and Co-Host of Cincinnati Edition

Howard Wilkinson joined the WVXU News Team after 30 years of covering local and state politics for The Cincinnati Enquirer. A native of Dayton, Ohio, Wilkinson has covered every Ohio governor’s race since 1974 as well as 12 presidential nominating conventions. His streak continued by covering both the 2012 Republican and Democratic conventions for 91.7 WVXU. Along with politics, Wilkinson also covered the 2001 Cincinnati race riots; the Lucasville Prison riot in 1993; the Air Canada plane crash at the Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport in 1983; and the 1997 Ohio River flooding. The Cincinnati Reds are his passion. "I've been listening to WVXU and public radio for many years, and I couldn't be more pleased at the opportunity to be part of it,” he says.

In 2012, the Society of Professional Journalists inducted Wilkinson into the Cincinnati Journalism Hall of Fame. 

Wilkinson co-hosts Cincinnati Edition on Thursday afternoons at 1:00 pm, blogs on politics and more, and writes the weekly column Politically Speaking at wvxu.org.

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Local News
3:01 pm
Mon November 26, 2012

Smitherman faces challenge in NAACP election

The Cincinnati chapter of the NAACP will hold an election for president Tuesday, with incumbent Christopher Smitherman being challenged by a long-time board member and union activist who believes Smitherman has steered the organization from its core civil rights mission.
 

Bob Richardson, a former officer of Laborers Local 265 and former president of the Cincinnati AFL-CIO Labor Council, is taking on Smitherman, now a Cincinnati city councilman. Smitherman is seeking a fourth two-year term as head of the city’s oldest civil rights organization.

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Inside Pitch
12:28 pm
Mon November 26, 2012

Official count unlikely to change Issue 4 vote

Tuesday is the day Ohio's 88 county boards of elections must report their final official results from the Nov. 6 election to Ohio Secretary of State Jon Husted.

In Hamilton County, that official count will include 13,771 provisional ballots cast on election that were deemed valid by the board of elections last week.

Those votes could have an impact on one ballot issue that was passed by a fairly narrow margin on election day - Issue 4, which would set four-year terms for Cincinnati City Council members.

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Local News
11:00 pm
Sat November 24, 2012

How did 81 people vote twice in Hamilton County?

It is hard to imagine, but 81 people in Hamilton County managed to cast more than one ballot in the Nov. 6 election.


That’s not a lot when you are talking about a county election where 419,076 valid votes were cast – about 0.2 percent of the total, not enough to change the outcome of any race or ballot issue – but, if there was intent to commit voter fraud, it is a crime – a fourth degree felony. 


And each and every one of them involved the casting of provisional ballots.

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Inside Pitch
7:56 am
Mon November 19, 2012

Wenstrup takes GOP policy committee seat

Brad Wenstrup, the newly-elected congressman from Ohio's 2nd Congressional District, has volunteered to join the House Republican Policy Committee, a group which helps set the legislative agenda for House Republicans.

Wenstrup - a 54-year-old podiatrist and Iraq war veteran from Columbia Tusculum - takes office in January, after pulling an upset victory over Rep. Jean Schmidt in the March GOP primary and easily defeating a little-known and seldom-seen Democrat, William R. Smith of Pike County, in the November election. Wenstrup won with 59 percent of the vote.

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Local News
11:00 pm
Sat November 17, 2012

Cincinnati's mayoral race beginning to take shape

The Hamilton County Board of Elections isn’t finished counting the votes from the Nov. 6 election; but it was only a matter of time before the 2013 race for Cincinnati mayor began.


John Cranley, the former Democratic city councilman and two-time congressional candidate, settled that hash this week when he announced he will be a candidate for mayor, issuing a press release and holding a flurry of media interviews.


Clearly, the 38-year-old Cranley, who has been out of office for nearly four years now, saw the value of being the first horse out of the gate.

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