Howard Wilkinson

Political Reporter

Howard Wilkinson joined the WVXU News Team after 30 years of covering local and state politics for The Cincinnati Enquirer. A native of Dayton, Ohio, Wilkinson has covered every Ohio governor’s race since 1974 as well as 12 presidential nominating conventions. His streak continued by covering both the 2012 Republican and Democratic conventions for 91.7 WVXU. Along with politics, Wilkinson also covered the 2001 Cincinnati race riots; the Lucasville Prison riot in 1993; the Air Canada plane crash at the Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport in 1983; and the 1997 Ohio River flooding. The Cincinnati Reds are his passion. "I've been listening to WVXU and public radio for many years, and I couldn't be more pleased at the opportunity to be part of it,” he says.

In 2012, the Society of Professional Journalists inducted Wilkinson into the Cincinnati Journalism Hall of Fame. 

Wilkinson appears on  Cincinnati Edition, blogs on politics and more, and writes the weekly column Politically Speaking at wvxu.org.

Ways to Connect

Say what you want about Mark Mallory’s eight years as mayor of Cincinnati, which are rapidly coming to a close.

You can love him; you can loathe him.

What you can’t do is ignore him.

The man is a showman. Part stand-up comic. Your genial host. The man of a thousand quips.

And, if you find yourself on the wrong side of an issue he supports, a bulldog, who fights and claws and cajoles until he gets what he wants. A mini-LBJ. A chip off the ol’ block – his father, William Mallory Sr., a leader in the Ohio House for decades, was the same way.

Jay Hanselman

Mayor Mark Mallory, quickly coming to the close of his eight years as Cincinnati mayor, used a combination of serious talk, comedic one-liners, videos and slide shows Tuesday night to make the case that he has helped turned a struggling city around.

Before a crowd of about 200 invited guests on a set dressed like a living room at Over-the-Rhine’s Ensemble Theatre, Mallory talked for an hour and five minutes about the legacy he leaves when he vacates the mayor’s office Dec. 1.

Ohio Secretary of State Jon Husted
State of Ohio

Ohio Secretary of State Jon Husted says that with the help of Ohio’s 88 county boards of elections, his office has virtually eliminated duplicate registrations from the state’s voter registration data base.

In a release Tuesday, Husted said there were more than 340,000 duplicate registrations when he took office in Jan. 2011. Today, he said, out of about 7.7 million registered voters, there are only four remaining.

Ohio Attorney General website

So far, only one of the 20 cases of alleged voter fraud referred by Ohio Secretary of State Jon Husted to the Ohio Attorney General’s office has resulted in a criminal conviction – that of a northern Kentucky woman who pleaded guilty to voting in Butler County last fall.

According to court records, 58-year-old Kim Trombetta of Newport entered a guilty plea in a Butler County court in June to a misdemeanor charge of falsification and was fined $1,000. Trombetta was told the fine would be reduced to $500 if she did 50 hours of community service.

It’s official now.

The 2013 Cincinnati mayoral race between Democrats Roxanne Qualls and John Cranley will be the most expensive since the city began direct election of the mayor in 2001.

That’s not much history to go on, but a record is a record.

Campaign finance reports filed this week showed that Cranley, a former city council member, had raised $909,775 through the Oct. 16 cut-off date, while Qualls had raised $640,000.

Official Portrait

It is time to delay the health insurance sign-up under the Affordable Care Act until the multitude of computer glitches that have frustrated millions of Americans can be worked out, Sen. Rob Portman said in Cincinnati Thursday.

“I support repeal of the whole thing and replacing it with something that is better, but I do think that a delay is appropriate now,’’ the Republican senator from Terrace Park told reporters Thursday morning.

In a poll of voters in the early presidential primary state of New Hampshire, Ohio's junior senator Rob Portman and Ohio governor John Kasich don't even register one percent support among Republican primary voters.

Kentucky's junior senator, Rand Paul, tops the list of 13 potential GOP presidential contenders for the 2016 Republican presidential nomination with 17 percent, followed by New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie at 16 percent.

Candidates for public office collect endorsements from groups and influential individuals the way that sports memorabilia enthusiasts collect autographed rookie baseball cards of Hall of Famers.

They hoard them.

And then they use them, for whatever they are worth, to get elected.

Cincinnati’s mayoral candidates, Roxanne Qualls and John Cranley have put together quite a collection.

In early 1941, as it became clearer that the Unites States was headed into war, President Franklin Roosevelt created the USO to provide emotional support to troops.

Tana Weingartner

The glitches in the government’s computer system that have been causing frustration for millions of Americans trying to sign up for health insurance under the Affordable Care Act are being worked out, Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius said in Cincinnati Wednesday.

“I will be the first to tell you that the web site launch was rockier than we wanted it to be,’’ Sebelius, a Cincinnati native said at a forum on the Affordable Health Care Act – also known as Obamacare –at Cincinnati State Technical and Community College Wednesday.

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