Howard Wilkinson

Political Reporter

Howard Wilkinson joined the WVXU News Team after 30 years of covering local and state politics for The Cincinnati Enquirer. A native of Dayton, Ohio, Wilkinson has covered every Ohio governor’s race since 1974 as well as 12 presidential nominating conventions. His streak continued by covering both the 2012 Republican and Democratic conventions for 91.7 WVXU. Along with politics, Wilkinson also covered the 2001 Cincinnati race riots; the Lucasville Prison riot in 1993; the Air Canada plane crash at the Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport in 1983; and the 1997 Ohio River flooding. The Cincinnati Reds are his passion. "I've been listening to WVXU and public radio for many years, and I couldn't be more pleased at the opportunity to be part of it,” he says.

In 2012, the Society of Professional Journalists inducted Wilkinson into the Cincinnati Journalism Hall of Fame. 

Wilkinson appears on  Cincinnati Edition, blogs on politics and more, and writes the weekly column Politically Speaking at wvxu.org.

Ways to Connect

The first of two elections this year to fill the vacant seat of former House Speaker John Boehner in Ohio's 8th Congressional District takes places Tuesday.

It is a special election to fill out the unexpired term of Boehner, the West Chester Republican, who not only resigned the speakership but resigned from the House last fall. He was, in essence, pushed out by a rebellious Republican House caucus that believed Boehner was too willing to compromise with the Democrat in the White House

Ohio's amazing "Golden Week" – the week before the deadline for voter registration where Ohioans can register to vote and cast their ballots at the same time.

Amazing, because it seems to keep materializing and de-materializing.

Abracadabra! Hocus pocus! Now you see it; now you don't.

Ohio hasn't had a vice presidential candidate since Republican John Bricker in 1944, but this year, three Ohio politicians, two Republicans and one Democrat, are under consideration. WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked Monday morning with news director Maryanne Zeleznik about the chances of John Kasich, Rob Portman or Sherrod Brown being named to the number two spot on the major party tickets. 

Hamilton County Juvenile Court

Suspended juvenile court judge Tracie Hunter was to have begun her six-month jail sentence Friday morning, but a federal judge has issued an emergency stay that will halt that, at least for now.

But, in a tense hearing in a common pleas courtroom, trial judge Patrick Dinkelacker argued that the decision of U.S. District Court Judge Timothy Black was in error.

Tana Weingartner / WVXU

Cincinnati City Manager Harry Black laid out a $1.2 billion all-funds operating budget for the city for fiscal year 2017 Thursday that he says is structurally balanced – mainly because the city's revenue is expected to increase.

Hamilton County Juvenile Court

Suspended juvenile court judge Tracie Hunter could begin serving her six-month jail sentence as soon as Friday, now that an Ohio Supreme Court majority has refused to hear her appeal.

Hunter is scheduled to appear before Hamilton County Common Pleas Court Judge Patrick Dinkelacker Friday morning for imposition of her sentence.

The vote in the Ohio Supreme Court had four justices voting against hearing her appeal and three who dissented.

  A veteran state legislator and the incumbent moved on in Tuesday's Covington mayoral primary to face each other in November.

Joe Meyer, a former state representative and senator who worked in former Gov. Steve Beshear's cabinet, came in first with 47 percent of the vote in a field of four candidates for mayor, according to the Kenton County Clerk's office.

Sherry Carran, who was first elected to the city commission in 2007 and became the city's first female  mayor in 2013, finished second with 40 percent of the vote.

Newport voters will go to the polls Tuesday and find a race that really isn't a race. And if they cast a ballot in that race, it won't be counted.

It's the city commission race; and Campbell County Clerk Jim Luersen said there is a good reason for not counting the votes.

Incumbent commissioner John Hayden decided in January that he would not run for re-election, but did not file paperwork with the clerk's office in time to have his name removed from the ballot, Luersen said.

It's entirely possible – even likely – that many people, including the subset of humanity known as "political pundits," can take polling done six months before a presidential election way too seriously.

Not to denigrate the pollsters. The Quinnipiac University Polling Institute, the academic polling operation that released two "key state" polls on the presidential election and Senate elections in Ohio, Florida and Pennsylvania last week is well-respected and professional.

One thing is certain - Covington residents will elect at least two new city commissioners this year. 

Incumbents Steve Frank and Chuck Eilerman are not running for re-election.

That has drawn a crowd of 10 Covington commission candidates who will be on the ballot in Tuesday's Kentucky primary.

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