Howard Wilkinson

Political Reporter

Howard Wilkinson joined the WVXU News Team after 30 years of covering local and state politics for The Cincinnati Enquirer. A native of Dayton, Ohio, Wilkinson has covered every Ohio governor’s race since 1974 as well as 12 presidential nominating conventions. His streak continued by covering both the 2012 Republican and Democratic conventions for 91.7 WVXU. Along with politics, Wilkinson also covered the 2001 Cincinnati race riots; the Lucasville Prison riot in 1993; the Air Canada plane crash at the Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport in 1983; and the 1997 Ohio River flooding. The Cincinnati Reds are his passion. "I've been listening to WVXU and public radio for many years, and I couldn't be more pleased at the opportunity to be part of it,” he says.

In 2012, the Society of Professional Journalists inducted Wilkinson into the Cincinnati Journalism Hall of Fame. 

Wilkinson appears on  Cincinnati Edition, blogs on politics and more, and writes the weekly column Politically Speaking at wvxu.org.

Ways to Connect

City of Cincinnati

Cincinnati Mayor John Cranley has used his veto power to fix what a council ordinance he believes would have resulted in a structurally unbalanced city budget.

On Wednesday, council voted 5-4 to reject a plan from City Manager Harry Black to boot cars with three or more unpaid parking tickets, a move that would have generated $600,000 for the city.

In Black's proposal, that money would be replaced with a $600,000 withdrawal from the urban development fund.

WVXU-FM

WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with News Director Maryanne Zeleznik Monday morning about the four likely Republican candidates for Ohio governor and the impact that President Trump could have on the race. 

If you are a Republican who wants to be elected the next governor of Ohio in 2018, you may be scratching your head over what to do about the man sitting in the White House, President Trump.

Do you run and cling to his side through next Spring's primary election, hoping that enough of those 2,841,005 Ohioans who voted for Trump for president last November will fall into your lap?

Former Enquirer editor Dennis Hetzel has combined his love of politics and sports in his new novel. 

US House of Representatives

Cincinnati Congressman Brad Wenstrup, who was a combat surgeon, was pressed into action Wednesday morning during the shooting at the Republican congressional baseball practice in Alexandria, Va.

WVXU-FM

WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with News Director Maryanne Zeleznik  Monday morning about rampant speculation that  former Cincinnati mayor and talk show host Jerry Springer might run against incumbent Republican Brad Wenstrup in Ohio's Second Congressional District. 

Bill Rinehart / WVXU

Standing on the banks of the Ohio River, with a barge full of West Virginia coal in the background, President Donald Trump outlined a $1 trillion infrastructure plan.

wikipedia.org

President Trump will come to Cincinnati's Rivertowne Marina on the banks of the Ohio River Wednesday afternoon for a speech on the nation's inland waterways.

It's the president's first stop on a nationwide campaign to sell the $1 trillion nationwide infrastructure plan he rolled out at the White House Monday.

WVXU

WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson spoke Monday with News Director Maryanne Zeleznik about a proposed constitutional amendment that would change the way Ohio draws its congressional district lines. 

There just seems to be something inherently unfair about how Ohio draws its congressional district lines, a process that, in 2011, was controlled by Republicans in the Ohio General Assembly.

It's not surprising that, in Cincinnati, people who follow politics closely are fixated between the mayoral race between two Democrats – incumbent John Cranley and council member Yvette Simpson.

John Cranley
Howard Wilkinson / WVXU

Cincinnati Mayor John Cranley rolled out his version of the $1.6 billion all-funds city budget Thursday afternoon, one in which he restored about $3 million in cuts that were in the budget proposal of City Manager Harry Black.

It is, Cranley said, a structurally balanced budget that plugs a $26 million deficit for this year.

Cincinnati city council members made it clear Monday that they don't much care for City Manager Harry Black's idea of plugging part of a budget hole with a parking ticket increase.

Black's proposed budget would increase parking tickets from $45 to $60.

WVXU

WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with News Director Maryanne Zeleznik Monday about the challenges the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee would face in taking on Republican incumbent Steve Chabot in Ohio's First Congressional District. 

Does the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee (DCCC) seriously think that Republican incumbent Steve Chabot is vulnerable next year in southwest Ohio's First Congressional District?

Apparently so.

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