Ann Thompson

Reporter & Midday Host

With more than 20 years of journalism experience in the Greater Cincinnati market, Ann Thompson brings a wealth of knowledge and expertise to her reporting. She has reported for WKRC, WCKY, WHIO-TV, Metro Networks and CBS/ABC Radio. Her work has been recognized by the Associated Press and the Society of Professional Journalists. In 2011 A-P named her “Best Reporter” for large market radio in Ohio. She has won awards from the Association of Women in Communications and the Alliance for Women in Media. Ann reports regularly on science and technology in Focus on Technology.

She has reported from Japan and South Korea, Germany and Belgium as part of fellowships from the East-West Center and RIAS.

Ways to Connect

Ann Thompson / WVXU

Update  4:25 p.m.: Pete Rose's attorney Ray Genco says Rose will address the media at 2 p.m. Tuesday. In a statement, Genco says "We are disappointed by the decision of Commissioner Manfred that was announced this morning. We are reviewing the ruling with Pete and his family."

Ann Thompson / WVXU

Cincinnati, an advertising hub, is well positioned to be a "relevant player "  when it comes to multi-platform storytelling involving technology, according to John Hendricks, director of creative technology for Possible, a worldwide advertising agency with offices in Cincinnati.

Ann Thompson / WVXU

Eliot Isaac, a long-time police veteran who has been interim chief for nearly three months, is Cincinnati’s new police chief.

In city council chambers at Cincinnati City Hall Thursday morning, City Manager Harry Black made official what most in the department and city hall have believed for months would happen – he appointed Isaac the city’s new police chief.

Black said he never considered any outside candidates for the job.

Bill Rinehart / WVXU

The toxic green glob of slime known as an algal bloom which spanned over 600 miles on the Ohio River in September, 2015 is gone now but water experts remain vigilant in efforts to control and treat it when it comes back.

Tuesday marks the second Algal Toxin Summit in as many years in Cincinnati, bringing together leading experts in water technology, utility water treatment, water quality and monitoring.

Eliot F. Gomez

University of Cincinnati graduate Eliot Gomez, now doing research in Sweden at  Linköping University, has demonstrated with other scientists the world's first electronic plant. In the future this technology could possibly power small electronic devices or delay blooming if there was a frost.

Here's how he put "wires" into a rose while being careful not to clog the plant or kill it:

Ann Thompson / WVXU

When big planes start flying regularly out of a largely vacant airport, people notice. That's the case at the Wilmington Air Park where, for a few months now, four Boeing 767s have been taking off daily.

Bill Rinehart / WVXU

Thirty-six years after eleven people were crushed to death while trying to gain entrance to the Who concert at the old Riverfront Coliseum, they are being remembered with a marker on the plaza level between the U.S. Bank Arena and Great American Ball Park.

A special ceremony is planned Thursday at 7:00 p.m. to dedicate the tall, black memorial.

Ann Thompson / WVXU

Chances are good you'll find a quadcopter, commonly known as a "drone," underneath your Christmas tree this year. The Federal Aviation Administration predicts 1 million people will get them as gifts.

Tana Weingartner / WVXU

International conservationists, desperate to save endangered species, have turned to technology in the hope it will make a difference  before it's too late.

Protect is beginning to implant tiny cameras in the horns of rhinos. The rhinos also wear a bright turquoise radio collar equipped with a heart-rate monitor. If a poacher approaches the animal's heart rate will jump. That triggers an alarm and sends GPS coordinates to rangers who come quickly in a truck or by a helicopter. Here is video from the embedded camera:

Cincinnati Public Schools/MainSail

Tuesday is the last day parents, administrators and the public can participate in a survey for Cincinnati Public Schools. The district wants guidance on things like the budget, the curriculum and the "Whole Child" and "My Tomorrow" initiatives, according to spokeswoman Janet Walsh.

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