Ann Thompson

Reporter & Midday Host

With more than 20 years of journalism experience in the Greater Cincinnati market, Ann Thompson brings a wealth of knowledge and expertise to her reporting. She has reported for WKRC, WCKY, WHIO-TV, Metro Networks and CBS/ABC Radio. Her work has been recognized by the Associated Press and the Society of Professional Journalists. In 2011 A-P named her “Best Reporter” for large market radio in Ohio. She has won awards from the Association of Women in Communications and the Alliance for Women in Media. Ann reports regularly on science and technology in Focus on Technology.

She has reported from Japan and South Korea, Germany and Belgium as part of fellowships from the East-West Center and RIAS.

Ways To Connect

WVXU file photo

The family of a man who died after being tased by a University of Cincinnati police officer has settled its claims with the university and officer Richard Haas.  After Everette Howard Jr. died in August 2011, UC police took all of their Tasers out of service. 

Sarah Ramsey WVXU

Cincinnati Public Schools is piloting an after-school program featuring the arts.  These high energy sessions can't help but keep the kids attention.

This is just the warm-up for the one-hour arts program at Hughes Center. After school, four days a week with alternating artists, kids get to experience something they may not have. On this day it's the Cincinnati Shakespeare Company and actress Jesse Wray Goodman.

WVXU

A fitness test, designed to offer incentives for Cincinnati Police officers to get in shape, will open up to the entire force in March.  I found out just how tough the standards are.

After struggling to get just a few more sit-ups, Police Academy trainer Amy Moore didn't give me much time before I started doing push ups. There are different levels. Each one earns a different number of stars. Here's what she would have to do to get four gold stars.

Michael Keating

Organizers of the annual Martin Luther King Cincinnati celebration are making sure his legacy lives on.

The Music Hall program had a decidedly upbeat feel to it, beginning with the applause during President Obama's inauguration on a big screen, to the words of keynote speaker Judge Jeffrey Hopkins. He said this generation, with God's help, can continue the change begun by Martin Luther King Jr.

WVXU

In Cincinnati, hundreds of people will celebrate the 30th anniversary of Martin Luther King Day.

A noon commemorative celebration at Music Hall is the culmination of a morning filled with remembrances. The day begins with a Freedom Center breakfast, a march to Fountain Square for a prayer service, and then a march to Music Hall. That's where the Honorable Judge Jeffery Hopkins will be the keynote speaker. There will also be choral and theatrical performances.

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Part of the President’s plan to reduce gun violence focuses on increased mental health services. Ann Thompson, in “Focus on Technology,” reports on Cincinnati efforts to be pro-active, involving a predictive spit test and photographing the brain.

 Dr. Jim Eliassen stands behinds glass at the University of Cincinnati Center for Imaging Research. 

UC

UC is helping to spearhead an effort to digitize rare library collections worldwide.

Archivist and historian Kevin Grace is just back from Vancouver where he spoke to representatives from 26 countries. More and more people want to access special collections without having to go to remote places to look at them.

Grace says lots of U.S. universities are putting rare photos and books online but many other countries lack the resources to put the necessary background information to go with them.

A new Cincinnati Children's Hospital survey finds one-third of teen girls actually have an in-person meeting with somebody they met online.

Psychologist Jennie Noll says abused or neglected teenage girls are more likely to present themselves in a more sexually provocative way online and therefore have more offline meetings. Noll studied the Internet and social media habits of 250 girls. About half were abused. She followed up a year later. Noll says the meeting part is scary for this age even though plenty of adults do it.

 

North Koreans continue to face restrictions over cell phone and computer usage. As Google’s chairman visits the country, Ann Thompson reports in Focus on Technology, what Eric Schmidt may want and what the future may hold for those who live there. East-West Center Associate Scott Thomas Bruce weighs in and so does Suk-Ho Shin, a reporter for South Korea's leading newspaper DONG-A-ILBO.


Since 2011 the City of Mason has closed nearly 110-million dollars in new investment and in the process created 14-hundred new jobs. It's a track record that's gaining attention.

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