Ann Thompson

Reporter & Midday Host

With more than 20 years of journalism experience in the Greater Cincinnati market, Ann Thompson brings a wealth of knowledge and expertise to her reporting. She has reported for WKRC, WCKY, WHIO-TV, Metro Networks and CBS/ABC Radio. Her work has been recognized by the Associated Press and the Society of Professional Journalists. In 2011 A-P named her “Best Reporter” for large market radio in Ohio. She has won awards from the Association of Women in Communications and the Alliance for Women in Media. Ann reports regularly on science and technology in Focus on Technology.

She has reported from Japan and South Korea, Germany and Belgium as part of fellowships from the East-West Center and RIAS.

Ways to Connect

Ann Thompson / WVXU

Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center researchers have perfected a technique they were working on more than two years ago, as reported in this story by WVXU, using pluripotent stem cells to generate functional, 3D human stomach tissue in a lab. Before they generated human intestinal tissue, now that they have made stomach tissue.

CABOOM

Six years after Martin Marietta filed plans to build an underground limestone mine, the group opposing it, Citizens Against Blasting on Our Miami (CABOOM) found out Thursday it has been successful in its bid to stop the mine.

Hamilton County Judge Robert Ruehlman scolded the Anderson Township Board of Zoning Appeals (BZA) for rubber stamping an earlier decision to allow the mine without even reading it. He said, "For these reasons, this court reverses the second decision of the Anderson Township BZA."

Martin Marietta could still appeal.

Ann Thompson / WVXU

Colombian Ambassador to to the United States Luis Villegas is no stranger to Cincinnati. He lived here 38 years ago while an exchange student at Xavier University. Now the Ambassador is touring the country trying to drum up business for what he calls a "new Columbia," one largely free of the drug-running, crime-ridden country of the past.

Ann Thompson / WVXU

It's no secret that teens don't get enough sleep on school nights, an estimated five to seven hours a night. They need nine. Researchers say not only does this affect their school work, it affects their driving.

Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center is studying whether adding 90 minutes of sleep a night will  make them more alert and decrease accidents. The study involves driving a simulator and monitoring the mood of the teen while they do it.

Cincinnati will once again be in the spotlight as "The Blunderer" begins filming November 17.

The movie stars Jessica Biel and Patrick Wilson and will be entirely shot in Greater Cincinnati. The same producers filmed "Carol" here and said, "The Film Commission, the rebate, locations, infrastructure,  and welcoming people of Cincinnati brought us back a second time within one year."

If you've been  to Over the Rhine lately, you know people are flocking  there on the weekends and increasingly during the week. New restaurants, new shops, and new apartments and condos are helping transform the urban core.

The subject came up during the 2015 Regional Economic Outlook at Eggs 'N Issues Tuesday at the METS Center. That's where members of the Northern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce and the Cincinnati USA Regional Chamber heard:

Ann Thompson / WVXU

Camp Washington volunteers are rolling up their sleeves and developing a two-acre parcel of land on the old Workhouse site into an urban garden. They also have the help of the River City Correctional Center residents who enjoy learning about farming and being outside.

They already have the winter crop in the ground. It consists of bibb lettuce, bok choy, peas, garlic bulbs and strawberries.

Ann Thompson / WVXU

City of Cincinnati employee Chris Hines bends over and installs a lock on one of nearly six dozen sewer grates that have been stolen this month.

This one is on Southside Ave. in Riverside.  City supervisor Rick St. John says Riverside and Sayler Park are where most have been stolen. A few have gone missing from South Fairmount and one from Camp Washington.

St. John says, "Unfortunately we can't afford to do a wholesale placement of locks, so a lot of times we put tar down... to make it difficult for somebody to pull the grates up."

Dr. Dylan Ward / University of Cincinnati

A camera and a computer may be all it takes to scientifically map earth formations.

Using a regular camera with Agisoft Photoscan software UC Geology Professor Dylan Ward pitched his tent at the bottom of a cliff near Ferron, Utah in May and began clicking away. He took 900 digital images at the base and once back in Cincinnati loaded them into the computer.

University of Cincinnati

University of Cincinnati graduate student Nate Wessel spent six months painstakingly mapping out bike paths in Greater Cincinnati and everything in between including bike shops, public transportation hubs, water fountains and grocery stores. He also has illustrated the changes in elevation.

The glossy new map is being distributed free at local coffee shops and bike stores around the city. It is also viewable online

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