Ann Thompson

Reporter & Midday Host

With more than 20 years of journalism experience in the Greater Cincinnati market, Ann Thompson brings a wealth of knowledge and expertise to her reporting. She has reported for WKRC, WCKY, WHIO-TV, Metro Networks and CBS/ABC Radio. Her work has been recognized by the Associated Press and the Society of Professional Journalists. In 2011 A-P named her “Best Reporter” for large market radio in Ohio. She has won awards from the Association of Women in Communications and the Alliance for Women in Media. Ann reports regularly on science and technology in Focus on Technology.

She has reported from Japan and South Korea, Germany and Belgium as part of fellowships from the East-West Center and RIAS.

Ways to Connect

Ann Thompson / WVXU

When students at Dayton High School in Dayton, Kentucky get in the lunch line they are greeted with lots of color. A salad bar filled with carrots, multi-color peppers, lettuce, cherry tomatoes, celery and more. A tall series of wire baskets contain apples, oranges and bananas.

Ann Thompson / WVXU

It’s a busy day in Montgomery County Domestic Relations Court. Dozens of people are waiting for their divorce hearings. Receptionist Sheila Jarvis keeps it running.

Not only does she answer the phone, she answers questions from people filling the hallways while they wait for their hearings. But she no longer has to check people in because this court now has kiosk check-in. Montgomery County is the first to use court kiosks in Ohio.

Michael E. Keating

If the frigid temperatures are forcing you to spend more time inside, you can bet the criminals are doing the same.

Cincinnati Police Lt. Col. Jim Whalen has seen it year after year. "Bad guys stay inside. There are fewer opportunities for crime and disorder and therefore fewer incidents occur and fewer people are out and about... that are even available to be victimized."

Whalen says he does see a decline in all types of crime at the onset of drastic weather changes.

The more dramatic the weather the more dramatic the effect.

Ann Thompson / WVXU

Another night of frigid temperatures means an overflow crowd at the Drop Inn Center.

In the warmth of the shelter, Ron Stewart explains a failed relationship put him on the streets and this facility has been helping him for the past three weeks. He is singing the praises of the Drop Inn Center which provides him with a place to eat and sleep, and a way out of homelessness.

Stewart says, "I'm making friends. I have a support system and I'm looking forward to being in my own place by the beginning of next month."

Ann Thompson / WVXU

Kentucky is leading the nation in its use of big data to help determine bail and criminal sentences.

The data-driven programs Kentucky and at least 20 other states use, like PSA-Court, look at a variety of factors including charges and criminal history. That information is given to a judge to help determine whether the defendant gets out on bail and how long their sentence will be.

Ann Thompson / WVXU

(This story first aired July 23, 2014.) 

Increasingly people are losing interest in the "one size fits all" approach for medical care. Sixty-eight year old Gary Marcum knew he didn't want it when he faced his second knee replacement. The first one was  a partial, but the recovery lasted months and he was in a lot of pain.

Ann Thompson / WVXU

(This story first aired September 10, 2014) 

The concept is 21st century clever. Help companies promote their products via Twitter, Facebook and Instagram  to get free products from special vending machines.

Patrick McDonald thought of this idea years ago and launched Innovative Vending Solutions in 2008. The company is based in West Carrollton. His partner is Jeff Thibodeau.

Ann Thompson / WVXU

Creation of a diversity respect program is at the center of a settlement between the Northwest Local School District and four former and current Colerain High School students who sued the district in a federal lawsuit in April, 2014. Plaintiffs claimed violation of free speech rights and discrimination of race.

All students, faculty and administrators will have to participate in the program, which could become a national model.

Ann Thompson / WVXU

Fifteen months after it began, the track loop for the Cincinnati Streetcar in Over the Rhine is now finished.

Just after 9:00 Monday morning workers welded the track together on Race Street between Elder and Green Streets, just south of Findlay Market.

This is the track that will serve as the test track for the first streetcar vehicles when they arrive in the fall of 2015. Workers still have to install overhead power lines and poles in OTR.


Have you ever  thought "I wish I had recorded that?" Kapture, a Cincinnati start-up company, has apparently solved that problem with an audio recording wristband.

Users, without breaking eye-contact, simply double tap to record the previous sixty seconds and with Bluetooth it goes to your smartphone and saves in a Kapture app where you can edit and post to Facebook, Twitter, email or text later.