Andy Chow

Andy Chow is a general assignment state government reporter who focuses on environmental, energy, agriculture, and education-related issues. He started his journalism career as an associate producer with ABC 6/FOX 28 in Columbus before becoming a producer with WBNS 10TV.

Andy gained his in-depth knowledge of Statehouse issues while working for Hannah News Service, an online-based news and research publication. He also participated in the Legislative Service Commission’s Fellowship program as a production assistant for “The Ohio Channel.”

Andy earned his Bachelor of Arts degree in broadcasting at Otterbein University and took part in the Washington Semester program through American University in Washington, D.C.

Republican leaders in the legislature are still looking at the possibility of freezing Medicaid expansion, a move the governor’s office says could result in a loss of health coverage for half a million people. 

The wind energy industry says Ohio has essentially placed a moratorium on new wind farm projects because of the rules for where turbines can be placed. But there are lawmakers who argue those tougher parameters protect the rights of landowners. 

Young professionals in Ohio are sharing their stories, pleading that Congress pass a law that will save them from deportation. These so-called Dreamers who were brought to the U.S. as children then lost their legal status say America is the only home they know. 

A bill is moving through the Ohio House that would let off duty peace officers carry weapons into gun-free zones. It's a bill has the support of police officers.

The wind energy industry says it can’t create new projects in Ohio, claiming they’re essentially handcuffed by stiff regulations over where turbines can be placed. A new proposal would loosen those restrictions.

The debate over gun-free zones is back in full swing at the Statehouse as lawmakers argue which should take precedence: the rights of gun owners or the rights of property owners. 

A state lawmaker is confident that a newly proposed program in Ohio could lead to curing major diseases worldwide. The system offers a different incentive than what currently exists.

All eyes are going to be on Ohio next year for what could be one of the biggest U.S. Senate races in the country. And it looks like it might be a rematch between incumbent Democrat Sherrod Brown and Republican challenger Josh Mandel. Rematches are rare but not unheard of.

Some 300,000 households and more than 88,000 business in Ohio have no access to broadband internet. Republican and Democratic state lawmakers are working together to find a cheaper way to bring high-speed internet to rural parts of Ohio. 

With just a week till its first debate among four announced candidates for governor, Ohio’s Democratic party is playing the waiting game to see if two high profile politicians could also jump into the race. Two possible contenders were testing the waters during one of the year’s biggest political holidays.

The Democratic Party is playing the waiting game to see if two high profile contenders jump into the governor’s race. One party leader says as far as a decision goes, the sooner the better.

There was a lot of hype built around Rich Cordray’s visit to Cincinnati to speak to labor groups. But that hype fizzled when it was clear that the former Ohio Attorney General had no intentions of announcing a run for governor.

A vocal critic of charter schools is asking the state to step in and block a major move by its largest online charter school. There’s concern that a planned switch to a new designation by the school could game the state out of taxpayer money.

In most of Ohio, the kids are back in school, and more than 800,000 of them ride buses to class each day. Figuring out the most efficient and most cost-effective way to do that is a complex equation. And it’s become more important now with student transportation taking a big hit in the new state budget. 

New limits on prescription painkillers took effect yesterday. And the state says prescription opioid deaths are down from a peak in 2011, and the number of heroin deaths last year was the same as in 2015. But now, deaths from illicit drugs such as cocaine and meth have spiked. 

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