Andy Chow

Andy Chow is a general assignment state government reporter who focuses on environmental, energy, agriculture, and education-related issues. He started his journalism career as an associate producer with ABC 6/FOX 28 in Columbus before becoming a producer with WBNS 10TV.

Andy gained his in-depth knowledge of Statehouse issues while working for Hannah News Service, an online-based news and research publication. He also participated in the Legislative Service Commission’s Fellowship program as a production assistant for “The Ohio Channel.”

Andy earned his Bachelor of Arts degree in broadcasting at Otterbein University and took part in the Washington Semester program through American University in Washington, D.C.

Lawmakers and the Kasich administration have gone back and forth on a budget issue that would change the way people with long term health problems would receive medical care. That provision is still on the table as the Senate works to craft their final draft of the budget bill.

Coal plants are struggling to make a profit in Ohio. And there have been proposals from regulators and lawmakers that would help prop up those plants by passing additional costs on to customers. However, legislators say their latest plan would help a struggling plant that was created under unusual circumstances that go back 60 years. 

Local government leaders believe municipalities are taking some big hits in the latest state budget proposal. Those advocates say this could create a domino effect for cities and towns around the state.

National and local leaders are voicing their support for the victims of a shooting that took place during baseball practice among members of Congress and staff in Washington DC this morning. 

Local leaders are urging state lawmakers to save Ohio’s nuclear plants in fear of the impact those shutdowns would have on their communities. 

Several Ohio cities, colleges and universities are joining a nationwide alliance to create a show of force to the country that they’re dedicated to fighting climate change. The effort comes just days after the U.S. announced plans to leave the Paris Climate Agreement. But the alliance in Ohio seems to stop at the local level.

Farmers all around Ohio are turning to lawmakers to help fix what they see as a major crisis. Taxes on their land have been soaring. But making a change to the tax formula could do some damage to a different industry.

City government officials from around the state are mounting a charge again opioid drug companies, following the state’s announcement to sue manufacturers of powerful painkillers. And a gubernatorial candidate is helping lead the charge. 

Some Ohio businesses are dismayed by President Donald Trump’s decision to back out of the global agreement to fight climate change. The advanced energy industry says this is a decision that can impact the more than 100,000 jobs tied to green energy in Ohio. One company said these actions have tangible consequences that hurt their bottom line.

A nationally recognized health official is pleading Ohio lawmakers to put more focus and resources into the opioid epidemic.

A doctor is breaking away from Ohio’s largest medical groups to support a proposed law that would force the state to buy drugs at a lower price. Statehouse correspondent Andy Chow reports.

Which test is best? That’s the debate among state lawmakers as Ohio schools have completely phased out state tests taken with paper and pencil in favor of online testing only. 

A sector of the advanced energy industry is calling on lawmakers to change a provision in the budget that would automatically throw $30 million into public transit projects.

Lawmakers on Capitol Hill are sifting through President Donald Trump’s budget proposal, which has gotten a lot of heat from Democrats. There’s one issue that has riled up some of Ohio’s top leaders on both sides of the aisle.

Politicians around the country and here in Ohio are sounding off on the allegations that a Republican congressional candidate body slammed a reporter. One top official believes this is part of a larger, cultural shift.

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