Andy Chow

Andy Chow is a general assignment state government reporter who focuses on environmental, energy, agriculture, and education-related issues. He started his journalism career as an associate producer with ABC 6/FOX 28 in Columbus before becoming a producer with WBNS 10TV.

Andy gained his in-depth knowledge of Statehouse issues while working for Hannah News Service, an online-based news and research publication. He also participated in the Legislative Service Commission’s Fellowship program as a production assistant for “The Ohio Channel.”

Andy earned his Bachelor of Arts degree in broadcasting at Otterbein University and took part in the Washington Semester program through American University in Washington, D.C.

A vocal critic of charter schools is asking the state to step in and block a major move by its largest online charter school. There’s concern that a planned switch to a new designation by the school could game the state out of taxpayer money.

In most of Ohio, the kids are back in school, and more than 800,000 of them ride buses to class each day. Figuring out the most efficient and most cost-effective way to do that is a complex equation. And it’s become more important now with student transportation taking a big hit in the new state budget. 

New limits on prescription painkillers took effect yesterday. And the state says prescription opioid deaths are down from a peak in 2011, and the number of heroin deaths last year was the same as in 2015. But now, deaths from illicit drugs such as cocaine and meth have spiked. 

More than 4,000 people died of a drug overdose last year in Ohio. That death toll went up by 33 percent over the previous year. And while Gov. John Kasich is rolling out more ways to crack down on painkiller prescriptions, critics believe there’s an obvious resource that’s not being utilized in the opioid crisis.

After a fiscal year that showed budget estimates were off for 11 months, a pair of Republican lawmakers wants to change up the budget-making process. They want to create a panel to look at the state’s economic forecast on a more consistent basis. This could ultimately circumvent the process around the governor’s office.

There is a fear nationwide that the same kind of hate march that happened in Charlottesville could happen again, even in Ohio. A variety of community groups gathered in Columbus to talk about hate and how to respond in its wake.

The embattled online charter school that’s had funding pulled back several times because of attendance and participation discrepancies is making a big move. The Electronic Classroom of Tomorrow is planning on becoming a dropout recovery school. 

For the first time in four decades the state Legislature has gone over the governor’s head to implement policy in the budget without his approval. 

Republican leaders are ready to deliver another blow to Gov. John Kasich. The Senate is likely to give final approval to at least some veto overrides that started in the House. The vote would be more than just a symbolic loss of power for the Kasich Administration.

The Democrats vying for the party’s gubernatorial nomination are starting to churn out more endorsements before next month’s first primary debate. 

As of now, someone who wants to start their own business in Ohio can do it completely online. That process has gone from an average waiting period of four days to four hours.

State lawmakers are gearing up for another round in the fight over renewable energy mandates. While opponents say they’re a financial burden, supporters say they help cut down on air pollution, which then improves respiratory health. There's a part of Ohio where the risk for experiencing breathing problems is one of the highest in the country.

The ballot language for issues voters will see during this November’s election has been finalized. One side is making sure to highlight a certain section of the language.

Gov. John Kasich has turned up the heat on President Donald Trump in the aftermath of Trump’s shaky position on white nationalists, neo-Nazis, the KKK and other hate groups. This marks another turn in the evolution of Kasich’s relationship with the Trump Administration.

There are important “do’s” and “don'ts” to protesting, according to a group that’s holding a workshop in Columbus to teach people how to demonstrate within their constitutional rights. 

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