Andy Chow

Andy Chow is a general assignment state government reporter who focuses on environmental, energy, agriculture, and education-related issues. He started his journalism career as an associate producer with ABC 6/FOX 28 in Columbus before becoming a producer with WBNS 10TV.

Andy gained his in-depth knowledge of Statehouse issues while working for Hannah News Service, an online-based news and research publication. He also participated in the Legislative Service Commission’s Fellowship program as a production assistant for “The Ohio Channel.”

Andy earned his Bachelor of Arts degree in broadcasting at Otterbein University and took part in the Washington Semester program through American University in Washington, D.C.

A top utilities watchdog, nominated to that spot by Gov. John Kasich, has stepped down after the Senate rejected that appointment. 

It’s coming down to the wire for lawmakers to reach agreement on a hot-button bill – how to shore up the fund that pays jobless benefits to unemployed workers. Several advocacy groups are still not happy with the proposal to change unemployment compensation funding.

Local leaders who are hoping state lawmakers will block a plan to increase the minimum wage might not get any help from the Senate. 

In the wake of Monday’s attack, students from the Ohio State University are adding a unique perspective to a bill that would lift the automatic concealed weapons ban on college campuses. 

Lawmakers could vote next week on a proposal to lift the automatic ban on concealed weapons on college campuses. Many Ohio State University students visited the Statehouse to call on Senators to reject the bill. 

The Ohio House is moving forward with a bill that once again changes the state’s green energy policy landscape -- as a freeze on state green energy standards is set to expire at the end of the year. 

The fight over the future of Ohio’s energy policies for the next three years is coming down to the wire and there are still different battles being fought.

A bill that allows people to carry concealed weapons into more areas such as daycares and college campuses is moving through the Legislature as the clock runs out on this year’s session. 

Ohioans around the state are expected to swarm to their favorite stores in order to cross items off their holiday gift list. Economic forecasters expect to see a jump in spending, but not as big a hike as usual.

Things are not always as they seem, and in the past couple of years that’s been the case for both Republican and Democratic nominees. Sometimes a candidate doesn’t live up to his or her potential or misleads the party in some way. Former party leaders say that could come down to the vetting process or the lack of one. 

The day after the election brought a swarm of media coverage of all things Donald Trump. But another story was playing out in northeast Ohio, where the Republican nominee for an Ohio House seat outed herself to actually be a Democrat. Cassandra McDonald discusses what drove her to that decision and what she takes away from this year’s race.

Ohio is outpacing most of the country in its work to bringing down the number of people who are homeless in the state. But those working with homeless Ohioans say there’s more work to do. 

The House and Senate are working on bills that could essentially continue a freeze on the state’s renewable energy requirements, something Gov. John Kasich says he’s against. But there are lawmakers who say soon, the threat of the governor's veto will not be as powerful as it used to be. 

The state’s top leaders are squaring off on a bill to change Ohio’s green energy policies, and the clock is ticking – a two year freeze on the state’s renewable energy standards for electric utilities expires in a few weeks. 

One of Ohio’s largest energy companies could be closing or selling all of its power plants within the next two years. 

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