Andy Chow

Andy Chow is a general assignment state government reporter who focuses on environmental, energy, agriculture, and education-related issues. He started his journalism career as an associate producer with ABC 6/FOX 28 in Columbus before becoming a producer with WBNS 10TV.

Andy gained his in-depth knowledge of Statehouse issues while working for Hannah News Service, an online-based news and research publication. He also participated in the Legislative Service Commission’s Fellowship program as a production assistant for “The Ohio Channel.”

Andy earned his Bachelor of Arts degree in broadcasting at Otterbein University and took part in the Washington Semester program through American University in Washington, D.C.

City government officials from around the state are mounting a charge again opioid drug companies, following the state’s announcement to sue manufacturers of powerful painkillers. And a gubernatorial candidate is helping lead the charge. 

Some Ohio businesses are dismayed by President Donald Trump’s decision to back out of the global agreement to fight climate change. The advanced energy industry says this is a decision that can impact the more than 100,000 jobs tied to green energy in Ohio. One company said these actions have tangible consequences that hurt their bottom line.

A nationally recognized health official is pleading Ohio lawmakers to put more focus and resources into the opioid epidemic.

A doctor is breaking away from Ohio’s largest medical groups to support a proposed law that would force the state to buy drugs at a lower price. Statehouse correspondent Andy Chow reports.

Which test is best? That’s the debate among state lawmakers as Ohio schools have completely phased out state tests taken with paper and pencil in favor of online testing only. 

A sector of the advanced energy industry is calling on lawmakers to change a provision in the budget that would automatically throw $30 million into public transit projects.

Lawmakers on Capitol Hill are sifting through President Donald Trump’s budget proposal, which has gotten a lot of heat from Democrats. There’s one issue that has riled up some of Ohio’s top leaders on both sides of the aisle.

Politicians around the country and here in Ohio are sounding off on the allegations that a Republican congressional candidate body slammed a reporter. One top official believes this is part of a larger, cultural shift.

A measure that would revise rules on fantasy sports, which haven’t been touched in decades, is on its way to the Senate after passing the House. 

A diverse team is forming to oppose a proposed law that would force the state to only buy drugs at a discounted price. The group fighting the so called “Drug Price Relief Act” features heavy-hitters from the left and right. 

About 90% of people on Medicaid are enrolled into a managed care program. A proposal floating around in the state legislature would increase that number by bringing people with long-term health problems into the fold. But Ohio’s nursing homes and assisted living communities are fighting back. 

State senators are considering a proposal to move more of Ohio’s Medicaid population into managed care. And a new study from a group representing health insurance companies in Ohio shows that managed health care for certain people saves money and proves to be more effective. 

The CEO of one of Ohio’s largest energy providers made a rare appearance before state lawmakers, pleading for nuclear plant subsidies. This push comes as the company is nearing a major decision.

The Senate is now considering a proposal that would ban undocumented workers from receiving workers’ compensation if they’re injured on the job. The measure passed through the House, but not without a heated debate between two fiery lawmakers.

Just a day after the first Democrat entered the race, a second Republican announced he’ll run for Secretary of State. That potentially sets up a tough primary between two established lawmakers.

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