Andy Chow

Andy Chow is a general assignment state government reporter who focuses on environmental, energy, agriculture, and education-related issues. He started his journalism career as an associate producer with ABC 6/FOX 28 in Columbus before becoming a producer with WBNS 10TV.

Andy gained his in-depth knowledge of Statehouse issues while working for Hannah News Service, an online-based news and research publication. He also participated in the Legislative Service Commission’s Fellowship program as a production assistant for “The Ohio Channel.”

Andy earned his Bachelor of Arts degree in broadcasting at Otterbein University and took part in the Washington Semester program through American University in Washington, D.C.

A large majority of the House and Senate are made up of lawmakers with strong pro-life stances. And that’s been reflected in several changes to abortion laws in the past few years. Despite those odds, pro-choice groups want to make sure every lawmaker will hear what they have to say on the issue before casting a vote. 

The state budget bill is heading over to the Senate for another round of hearings after passing through the House. But there seems to be questions over if the plan as it stands now is balanced.

Republicans leaders in the House have rolled out more changes to the state budget bill which includes tougher access to Medicaid expansion money. The final budget vote is expected in the House this week. 

The new budget plan introduced by House Republicans strips away Gov. John Kasich’s tax reform plans, adds money to schools and to fight the opioid epidemic, and cuts spending growth. But there are a few proposals peppered into the budget that may have gone unnoticed at first glance. 

The Ohio House is looking over a new budget proposal that has a fair share of controversial recommendations. One that’s catching the eye of many advocates is a new requirement for the 700,000 people getting Medicaid through the expansion pushed by Gov. John Kasich in 2013. 

House Republicans went back to the drawing board to roll out a new budget plan after seeing tax revenues coming up short month after month. The changes include taking out nearly all of Gov. John Kasich’s tax reform proposals and redirecting focus on the drug epidemic.

The state has been trying to fight modern day slavery on several different fronts, from revising the laws to raising awareness about human trafficking. A coalition of community groups are learning more about what can be done for the victims once they’re out of the system.

Cleanup is under way in Stark County where millions of gallons of drilling material spilled into a wetland during the construction of a natural gas pipeline. 

There are a handful of proposals at the Statehouse that attempt to cut down on prison time in favor of rehabilitation. Supporters believe this reduces Ohio’s overcrowded prisons and reduce repeat offenses. One group is trying to bring the voice of victims into the conversations.

Ohio’s opioid crisis has been tearing through the state causing one tragedy after another. For months, Democrats have been calling on Gov. John Kasich to release rainy day funds to aid in the fight. One Republican who wants to replace him was asked at a broadcasters' gathering to weigh in on that.

One of the state’s largest utility companies is proposing a change to the way they charge customers for their power. Some groups are crying foul, but AEP Ohio says other changes will offset those costs. 

State energy regulators are looking over a new plan, proposed by AEP, that would allow the utility company to increase rates on customer electric bills. 

The utility that owns Ohio’s two nuclear power sites say it needs to charge its customers more in order save the struggling plants. The senator who’s proposing a bill that would allow that to happen is accused of having a conflict of interest.

House Democrats and environmental advocates are warning of a public health threat that can be all around us but go unseen and they say it’s only getting worse. 

While addressing some big budget concerns, Gov. John Kasich seemingly threw some shade at leaders in Washington regarding what they have and also have not done since being elected. 

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