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ARUN RATH, HOST:

Earlier this month, convicted fraudster Neil Moore showed prison authorities his bail letter and walked out the front gate of Britain's Wandsworth jail in south London.

There was only one thing wrong with the picture: the letter was a fake — an elaborate forgery produced by the 28-year-old inmate.

Updated at 4:50 p.m. ET

When Indiana's Republican Gov. Mike Pence signed a bill into law allowing the state's businesses to refuse to serve same-sex couples based on religious grounds, he knew the move was a controversial one.

London’s Bedlam Burial Ground looks almost like any other inner-city construction site. Workers in bright jackets and safety helmets mill purposefully about, comparing measurements and clearing earth.

But look closer and it's clear that something unusual is happening: A pair of thigh bones poke up through newly exposed soil; a human skull, complete with a few yellowing teeth, sits in a sample bag next to a handful of vertebrae; an archeologist painstakingly brushes at the dirt surrounding a jawbone.

Yemeni President Abed Rabbo Mansour Hadi described Shiite Houthi rebels who have occupied parts of the country, including the capital, Sanaa, as "puppets of Iran."

The remarks by Hadi, who was forced to flee Yemen amid the rebel onslaught, come as a Gulf diplomatic official quoted by news agencies says that Arab nations allied against the Houthis could continue their airstrikes against the Shiite militia for months.

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