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The Two-Way
2:32 pm
Mon March 11, 2013

In Noma's Norovirus Episode, Ignored Emails Get Some Blame

The facade of Noma in Copenhagen. More than 60 diners complained of nausea and diarrhea after eating at the widely acclaimed restaurant last month.
Dresling Jens AP

Days after news spread that Danish restaurant Noma, three-time winner of Restaurant magazine's "World's Best Restaurant" title, was blamed for a norovirus outbreak in which dozens of diners fell ill, the restaurant has issued a public response and sought to clarify its handling of the situation.

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The Two-Way
1:46 pm
Mon March 11, 2013

Update: Falkland Islands Voters Opt To Stay With Britain

Residents gather in Stanley, Falkland Islands on Monday, during a referendum intended to show the world that they want to stay British amid increasingly tense relations with Argentina.
Tony Chater AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue March 12, 2013 8:38 am

Update at 8:35 a.m. ET, March 12. Nearly Unanimous:

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All Tech Considered
1:40 pm
Mon March 11, 2013

May You Tweet In Peace: Social Media Beyond The Grave

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon March 11, 2013 1:54 pm

What happens after we die? For millennia it's been both a question and a debate among mortal humans, but in the 21st century, there's a new twist: What happens to our social media life once we've left this earth (and does the afterlife have Wi-Fi)?

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The Two-Way
12:34 pm
Mon March 11, 2013

Tibetan Customs Include Horse Races ... And Paramilitary Police?

A close look at a photo of the Nagqu horse festival in northern Tibet at the National Museum of China in Beijing reveals a gaggle of surprising "spectators" at the traditional Tibetan event: Chinese paramilitary police (see enlargement).
Louisa Lim NPR

Originally published on Mon March 11, 2013 1:09 pm

In the exiled Tibetan calendar, March 10 is an emotive day, the anniversary of a failed uprising in 1959.

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The Two-Way
12:21 pm
Mon March 11, 2013

International Convention Moves To Limit Shark 'Finning' Trade

Indonesian fishermen unload their catch, including sharks and baby sharks, in Lampulo fish market in Banda Aceh last week.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon March 11, 2013 2:33 pm

Delegates to an international species conservation conference in Bangkok, Thailand, this week have agreed to limit the trade of shark fins and meat.

NPR's Christopher Joyce reports that government representatives to the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species, or CITES, have agreed to put the porbeagle, oceanic whitetip, three kinds of hammerhead shark and two kinds of manta ray on its Appendix II list, which places restrictions on fishing but still allows limited trade.

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