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ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

BARACK OBAMA: There's been another mass shooting in America.

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Kunduz takeover shows we're not dealing with the same old Taliban

17 hours ago
Reuters

The world seems shocked by the Taliban attack on Kunduz, but not GroundTruth Project reporter Jean MacKenzie.

"It's a public relations thing. The Taliban, they know very well that they can't hold this city and they really can't retake Afghanistan. So we can't make too much of their taking territory. But they have made the headlines, they're back in the world's eye view, and they are able to claim that they are still a force to be reckoned with," MacKenzie says.

Students who experience traumatic events while growing up in poor, turbulent neighborhoods could be considered disabled, a federal judge has ruled in a high-profile case involving the Compton, Calif., schools.

The ruling from U.S. District Judge Michael W. Fitzgerald, released on Wednesday, involves a class-action lawsuit filed against the Compton Unified School District. The plaintiffs argued that students who have experienced trauma are entitled to the same services and protections that schools must provide to traditionally disabled students.

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ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Writer Jojo Moyes has a name that lacks gravitas. To be honest, I even feel a bit silly saying her name when I recommend her novels to people — which I do, often and energetically. It's hard to imagine a "Jojo" ever winning the Nobel Prize for Literature; but Moyes has already won a pretty good consolation prize — that is, the kind of staunch, adoring readership that will follow her novels anywhere they go.

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