NPR News

Camden, N.J. has long been known for its poverty and violence. But President Obama gave it a new label this week, calling the city, "a symbol of promise for the nation."

He praised the Camden County Police Department's effort to improve community relations. The city still has a high crime rate, but the president says progress so far makes it a model for others.

Robert Gates, the president of the Boy Scouts of America, tells NPR his organization will have a decision on its ban on gay adults no later than October. His comments, in an interview to be aired on Weekend Edition Saturday, come a day after he told the Boy Scouts that its ban on gay adults was "unsustainable."

Hundreds of thousands of people are expected to fill the streets of the capital of El Salvador on Saturday to celebrate as one of Latin America's most revered and controversial religious figures is beatified — the last official step before sainthood.

They will gather to pay tribute to former Archbishop Oscar Romero, a beloved priest and staunch defender of the poor, who was murdered while celebrating Mass in 1980.

The Future Of Cardiology Will Be Shown In 3-D

1 hour ago

How can you tell ­the difference between a good surgeon and an exceptional one?

You could start by looking for the one who has the rare ability to visualize a human organ in three dimensions from little more than a scan.

"The handful of the top surgeons in the world are like sculptors," said Dr. Deepak Srivastava, a director at the Gladstone Institute of Cardiovascular Disease in San Francisco.

One year after an army-led coup toppled Thailand's elected government, authorities detained a dozen student activists in the capital and elsewhere for gathering to protest the putsch.

"We invited them to talk but they would not back down so we are sending them to the police," a soldier in the area who declined to be identified was quoted by Reuters as saying.

Jonathan Ernst/Reuters

Discussing trade deals is generally about as exciting as watching grass grow, but a huge new pact called the Trans-Pacific Partnership is firing up public opinion.

The deal, called TPP for short, involves the United States and 11 other countries that together represent close to a billion people and 40 percent of the world's economy. It's a big deal, but critics says it's also a bad deal, one that will hurt the average American.

A branch of the self-declared Islamic State has claimed responsibility for the suicide bombing of a Shiite mosque in eastern Saudi Arabia that has killed at least 19 people, a move that could represent a significant escalation of the extremist group's operations in the kingdom.

NPR's Leila Fadel reports from Cairo that the online statement from ISIS "named and praised the Saudi suicide bomber who detonated himself amongst a congregation of Shiite Saudis praying in a mosque in the village of al Qudaih in Qatif province."

In his column this week, Charles Blow of The New York Times broke down the difference between "bikers" and "thugs" in the wake of the deadly biker gang shootout in Waco, Texas:

John Phelan started collecting photography books just four years ago, and his trove is already "somewhere north of 3,500.”

The books, Phelan says, are “the closest you can get to the actual product," the experience of looking at a work of art the way the artist envisioned it. And getting that experience takes some doing: The majority of his books are issued in limited editions that are sometimes hand-numbered or signed. That makes them fetishized works of art in and of themselves, and they're snapped up in practically no time.

Noel Gomez was coerced into becoming a prostitute in Seattle when she was 16. Fifteen years, and lots of abuse later, she finally got out of "the life." Yesterday, she shared her story with us.

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