It's All Politics
3:25 pm
Thu July 12, 2012

Three Crucial Years Propel Romney's Business Career Back To Center Stage

Thomas Monaghan (left), founder and chairman of Domino's Pizza, signs an agreement to sell a "significant portion" of his stake in the company to Mitt Romney's Bain Capital, in 1998. Romney, then Bain's CEO, maintains that he left the firm the following year.
Scott Gries AP

Originally published on Thu July 12, 2012 4:00 pm

Three years might not seem like a big deal when looking back over Mitt Romney's two-decade career with Bain Capital.

But a growing number of journalists — and the Obama campaign — think it is.

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The Two-Way
2:58 pm
Thu July 12, 2012

Wells Fargo Agrees To $175 Million Settlement Over Lending Discrimination

Wells Fargo has denied claims of lending discrimination and said it's settling "solely for the purpose of avoiding contested litigation with" the Justice Department
Karen Bleier AFP/Getty Images

Wells Fargo Bank agreed to pay at least $175 million Thursday to resolve allegations it discriminated against black and Latino home buyers, in what the Justice Department called the second largest settlement over fair lending violations.

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The Two-Way
2:48 pm
Thu July 12, 2012

No Reason To Get Excited, Dylan Says: PBS Has The Wrong Guitar

Bob Dylan in April 1965, just as he was going electric.
Harry Thompson Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 12, 2012 4:48 pm

The sleuths at PBS' History Detectives show think they've had their hands on the guitar Bob Dylan played when he famously (or infamously?) "went electric" at the Newport Folk Festival in 1965.

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The Two-Way
2:30 pm
Thu July 12, 2012

Saudi Arabia Will Send Two Women To The Olympics

In this May photo, members of a Saudi female soccer team listen to their captain, Rawh Abdullah, before their training session at a secret location in Riyadh. The decision to send female athletes to the Olympics will definitely have consequences at home.
Hassan Ammar AP

Originally published on Thu July 12, 2012 2:40 pm

Under international pressure, Saudi Arabia has decided to send two women to the Olympics in London.

That means that for the first time ever, the Olympic games will include women from every competing country. NPR's Howard Berkes filed this report for our Newscast unit:

"Saudi Arabia now joins Qatar and Brunei as the last countries to enter women into Olympic competition. Seven athletes once banned because of their gender will compete in judo, track, swimming, table tennis and shooting events when the London Olympics begin later this month.

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The Salt
2:23 pm
Thu July 12, 2012

Studies Tie Human Bladder Infections To Antibiotics In Chicken

Some chicken contains the same antibiotic-resistant E. Coli that's been found to cause recurrent bladder infections.
iStockphoto.com

What do some persistent human bladder infections and some innocent-looking chicken cutlets have in common? Drug-resistant E. coli, scientists say.

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Shots - Health Blog
2:09 pm
Thu July 12, 2012

Staph Infections Tied To Misuse Of Drug Vials

Misuse of a medical vials can spread infections.
Sean Locke iStockphoto.com

Ten people were hospitalized and one was found dead after contracting staph infections from injections received at health clinics in Delaware and Arizona in early spring, according the Center for Disease Control and Prevention.

The infection clusters were described in the latest Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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The Two-Way
1:56 pm
Thu July 12, 2012

Yahoo! Confirms Data Breach; 400,000 Passwords At Risk

The Yahoo sign in Times Square in a 2006 file photo.
Don Emmert AFP/Getty Images

Yahoo said today that hackers had stolen and posted a file that contained 400,000 usernames and passwords.

The New York Times reports that those credentials were used not only for Yahoo! services but to services such as Gmail, AOL, Hotmail, Comcast, MSN, SBC Global, Verizon, Bellsouth and Live.com.

The Times' Bits blog reports:

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Korva Coleman is a newscaster for NPR.

In this role, she is responsible for writing, producing, and delivering national newscasts airing during NPR's newsmagazines All Things Considered, Morning Edition, and Weekend Edition. Occasionally she serves as a substitute host for Talk of the Nation, Weekend All Things Considered, and Weekend Edition.

Before joining NPR in 1990, Coleman was a staff reporter and copy editor for the Washington Afro-American newspaper. She produced and hosted First Edition, an overnight news program at NPR's member station WAMU-FM in Washington, D.C.

Early in her career, Coleman worked in commercial radio as news and public affairs directors at stations in Phoenix and Tucson.

The Two-Way
1:11 pm
Thu July 12, 2012

Prosecutors Release New Evidence In Trayvon Martin Case

George Zimmerman, left, and attorney Don West appear before Circuit Judge Kenneth R. Lester, Jr. during a bond hearing in June.
Joe Burbank AP

Prosecutors have released new evidence in the case against George Zimmerman, the Florida man charged with the murder of Trayvon Martin.

As The Orlando Sentinel reports, the new evidence doesn't reveal any "blockbusters." But it does include new testimony police officers on the scene, as well as new testimony from witnesses

The Sentinel reports:

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The Two-Way
1:07 pm
Thu July 12, 2012

Cheers For Biden At NAACP Convention As He Contrasts Obama And Romney

A day after Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney spoke to the nation's oldest civil right organization, Vice President Joe Biden appeared at the NAACP's annual convention. He quickly tackled one issue that drew Romney sustained boos — the 2010 health care overhaul.

Biden appeared in place of President Obama, who made a brief videotaped address thanking the group for its work. He walked out to warm applause, and several of his remarks were interrupted by shouts of agreement.

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