The Two-Way
7:51 am
Wed August 22, 2012

Texas Sheriff: Sacred White Buffalo Was Not Slaughtered

Lightning Medicine Cloud, a sacred white buffalo, last June.
LM Otero AP

The mystery surrounding the death of a rare white buffalo and the claim by some Lakota Sioux in Texas that it had been killed by other Native Americans deepened Tuesday. A local sheriff announced that investigators believe the animal died of a bacterial disease and said the case is now closed.

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The Two-Way
7:11 am
Wed August 22, 2012

Romney's Pick Of Ryan Hasn't Changed Race, Polls Signal

Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney, left, shakes hands with his choice for running mate, Rep. Paul Ryan of Wisconsin, Monday in in Manchester, N.H.
John Moore Getty Images

Two new polls come to much the same conclusion about the 2012 presidential campaign:

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Participation Nation
7:03 am
Wed August 22, 2012

Seize The Clay In Philadelphia, Pa.

Checking out a wall display of art from the Claymobile.
Courtesy of The Clay Studio

Originally published on Thu September 20, 2012 11:42 am

When I moved to Philadelphia seven years ago, I was looking to take a ceramics class. Instead I found a wonderful community-minded program in which I've made lifelong friends, unleashed children's creativity and touched their hearts. They in turn have touched mine.

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Book Reviews
7:03 am
Wed August 22, 2012

A Bartender's 'Tale' In Nostalgic Soft-Focus

Originally published on Wed August 22, 2012 7:46 am

At the moment Rusty, the young protagonist of The Bartender's Tale, is rescued from his Aunt Marge's house in Phoenix, author Ivan Doig cranks into motion a dense valentine of a novel about a father and a small town at the start of the 1960s. Rusty's liberator is also his father, Tom Harry, the august bartender and proprietor of the Medicine Lodge bar in Gros Ventre, Mont. Tom is the archetypical flinty Western bartender, slinging beers and shots of wisdom cultivated from a less than perfect life.

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First Reads
7:03 am
Wed August 22, 2012

Exclusive First Read: Michael Chabon's 'Telegraph Avenue'

Michael Chabon lives in Berkeley with his wife, writer Ayelet Waldman, and their children.
Ulf Andersen

Originally published on Fri September 7, 2012 1:46 pm

  • Listen to the Excerpt

Michael Chabon sets his sprawling new novel, Telegraph Avenue, in his adopted home of Berkeley, Calif., and its grittier southern neighbor, Oakland. With its multiracial, multigenerational cast of jazz musicians, former blaxploitation stars, midwives, gay teens and Black Panthers-turned-politicians, the book both celebrates and gently sends up the countercultural norms and complex racial politics of East Bay life.

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Business
5:23 am
Wed August 22, 2012

Chinese Factories Improve Conditions Where iPads Are Made

Originally published on Wed August 22, 2012 4:11 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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Law
4:51 am
Wed August 22, 2012

Jury To Decide Apple's Patent Case Against Samsung

Originally published on Wed August 22, 2012 4:10 pm

What your next smart phone or tablet computer might look like is in the hands of a California jury. In one of the biggest patent infringement cases ever, Apple is suing Samsung — charging that in creating its products, Samsung ripped off iPhone and iPad technology. Samsung countered with its own allegations.

This case is complex, the legal issues are daunting, and the jury's decision has to be unanimous.

"What's at stake here is the future of smartphones and the tablet market," says intellectual property expert Christopher V. Carani.

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Middle East
3:06 am
Wed August 22, 2012

Syrian Conflict Stokes Unease In Lebanon

Lebanese masked gunmen from the al-Mokdad clan gather for a news conference in Beirut's southern suburbs on Aug. 15. The Mokdads, a large Lebanese Shiite Muslim clan, said they kidnapped at least 20 Syrians to try to secure the release of a family member abducted by Syrian rebels near Damascus this week.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed August 22, 2012 9:43 am

In Lebanon, a wave of kidnappings and an alleged plot to destabilize the country with bombings — both related to the uprising in Syria — are shaking Lebanon's precarious sectarian balance.

That's been apparent on al-Mokdad Street in south Beirut, which has been tense in recent days. The Mokdads are a large Shiite clan who control the street that is named for them. Young men with pistols in their pockets cruise the street on motor scooters, acting as the clan's lookouts.

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Around the Nation
3:05 am
Wed August 22, 2012

Trying To Tame The (Real) Deadliest Fishing Jobs

Crew members of a scallop boat float in their survival suits during a drill in Point Judith, R.I.
Jesse Costa WBUR

Originally published on Wed August 22, 2012 4:09 pm

On the fishing-boat piers of New England, nearly everyone knows a fisherman who was lost at sea.

Boat captain Joe Neves remembers when a crew member got knocked overboard. "We heard him screaming 'Help me!' " Neves says, grimacing. "But you know, on the water at night, your head is like a little coconut." They didn't find him.

Mike Gallagher discovered a friend who was entangled in still-running hydraulics. "I knew right away he was dead," he says.

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It's All Politics
3:04 am
Wed August 22, 2012

Are Independents Just Partisans In Disguise?

Don Nichols iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed August 22, 2012 7:31 am

Independent voters have grown in recent years into a mega voting bloc. By some estimates they outnumber registered Republicans, and even registered Democrats.

Every election cycle, independents generate enormous amounts of interest as candidates, pollsters and the media probe their feelings. These voters are widely considered to hold the key to most elections.

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