It's All Politics
7:32 am
Sun August 26, 2012

Romney's Auto Bailout Stance Complicates Campaign In Battleground Ohio

Cars at the General Motors Assembly plant in Lordstown, Ohio, in 2009.
Mark Stahl AP

Originally published on Sun August 26, 2012 4:00 pm

The auto industry is big business in Ohio. Billions of dollars' worth of cars and auto parts are made in the state each year. Thousands of unionized auto workers live in Ohio, as do the business owners and employees who make it one of the top auto parts suppliers in the nation.

So, the auto bailout is a hot issue — and a complicated one.

For Republicans in Ohio, the bailout is a tough issue — perhaps because of Mitt Romney's initial stance, or perhaps because of the consensus that the bailout worked.

Read more
Participation Nation
6:25 am
Sun August 26, 2012

Clean And Green In Fort Wayne, Ind.

Stephen J. Bailey is cleaning up his city.
Courtesy of Fort Wayne's Downtown Improvement District.

Originally published on Sun August 26, 2012 10:13 am

My friend Stephen J. Bailey is a strong voice for the revitalization of downtown Fort Wayne. He oversees social media and web development for the Downtown Improvement District. He enjoys running and whenever he runs through downtown or the West Central area, he takes a bag with him so he can pick up trash as he goes.

Read more
Africa
6:24 am
Sun August 26, 2012

Ugandan Gold Medalist Returns To Fame And Fortune

Uganda's Stephen Kiprotich wins the gold medal in the men's marathon at the 2012 London Olympics. As the impoverished country's second gold medalist in 40 years, Kiprotich became an instant national hero.
Kyodo/Landov

Originally published on Sun August 26, 2012 6:02 pm

On the last day of the London Olympics, a Ugandan runner seemingly came from nowhere during the marathon to pass the favored Kenyan and Ethiopian athletes and win gold.

Stephen Kiprotich is the first gold medalist from Uganda since John Akii-Bua won the 400-meter hurdles at the 1972 Munich Olympics. In the last two weeks, Kiprotich has become an unlikely national hero in a struggling country that rarely has much to cheer about.

Read more
Around the Nation
6:24 am
Sun August 26, 2012

Snakes, And The Snake Wranglers Who Love Them

Matt and Paula Wilson (in background) clear rattlesnakes from a field in Pennsylvania. They work as snake wranglers, clearing areas for natural gas company employees.
Scott Detrow WITF

Originally published on Sun August 26, 2012 12:32 pm

Jobs on natural gas drilling sites can have funny-sounding names: There are roustabouts, mud men, doodlebuggers and snake wranglers. That last one — snake wrangler — is exactly what it sounds like.

Everyone hates snakes, right?

Even Indiana Jones hates snakes.

But — not everybody.

Read more
Animals
6:24 am
Sun August 26, 2012

A Pachyderm's Ditty Prompts An Elephantine Debate

Shanthi explores her yard at the Smithsonian National Zoo in Washington, D.C., in 2010. The 36-year-old Asian elephant loves blowing into a harmonica.
Mehgan Murphy Smithsonian Institution

Originally published on Thu August 30, 2012 8:06 pm

Read more
Author Interviews
6:24 am
Sun August 26, 2012

'The Ethicist' Explains How To 'Be Good'

Randy Cohen served as "The Ethicist" for The New York Times Magazine for 12 years.
Courtesy Chronicle Books

Originally published on Sun August 26, 2012 12:32 pm

After 12 years writing a column on ethics, Randy Cohen is convinced ethics is not a moving target, unique to time or place.

"I believe there are a set of principles that are so profound and so essentially moral that if I were just slightly smarter and slightly more eloquent, I could travel everywhere and persuade everyone that they should apply," he tells Weekend Edition guest host Linda Wertheimer.

Read more
Books
6:24 am
Sun August 26, 2012

Faith, Family, And Forgiveness In 'We Sinners'

Author Hanna Pylvainen based We Sinners on her own childhood experiences.

Originally published on Sun August 26, 2012 12:32 pm

Hanna Pylvainen's debut novel, We Sinners, is about a large — very large — family that belongs to a small religious sect in Finland originating in the dim distant past. The sect, Laestadianism, calls for very strictly regulated behavior — think Amish, with possible overtones of Lutheran, purified by a schism or two. The novel is told from the point of view of family members, each of whom get a chapter, and the story goes forward in time with each person.

Read more
Presidential Race
5:27 am
Sun August 26, 2012

Despite Delay, Republican Stage Is Set In Tampa

Workers prepare for the Republican National Convention inside the Tampa Bay Times Forum in Tampa, Fla., on Saturday.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Tue August 28, 2012 9:32 am

After a year and a half of preparations, Tampa, Fla., is ready host the Republican National Convention.

Some 70,000 delegates, support personnel, media and protestors are gathering for the party's nominating event. Originally scheduled to start on Monday, the convention was pushed back because of Tropical Storm Isaac.

Inside the Tampa Bay Times Forum — a hockey arena that's been transformed into a high-tech political stage — it's a vision in red, white and blue. There's a nod to tradition, placards marking the sections reserved for each state's delegation.

Read more
Middle East
5:21 am
Sun August 26, 2012

Palestinians Flood Into Israel, If Only Briefly

A mother and son wait to enter Israel through the Qalandia checkpoint, which separates the West Bank and Jerusalem. Most of the year, Israel permits relatively few Palestinians to visit, but over the Muslim holy month of Ramadan, 1.2 million Palestinians were allowed in.
Daniel Estrin for NPR

Originally published on Sun September 2, 2012 11:27 am

As Palestinian Muslims in the West Bank celebrated the end of Ramadan this past week, many traveled to a place that's usually off limits: Israel.

At the main Israeli checkpoint between the West Bank and Jerusalem, you could hear the taxi drivers offering to take Palestinians to the beach in Tel Aviv.

The drive is no more than an hour from the West Bank boundary to Israel's Mediterranean coast. Yet many Palestinians have not taken a dip in years, if ever.

Read more
Remembrances
5:21 am
Sun August 26, 2012

In Just 'One Small Step' Armstrong Became An Icon

Armstrong stepped into history July 20, 1969, leaving the first human footprint on the surface of the moon.
NASA Getty Images

Originally published on Sun August 26, 2012 12:32 pm

It was the kind of history that ignites the imagination of humanity.

On July 20, 1969, hundreds of millions of people around the world watched or listened as the lunar module Eagle carried astronauts Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin to the surface of the moon. Armstrong got on the radio to let them know "the Eagle has landed."

Almost seven hours later, Armstrong stepped off the ladder in his bulky white space suitand said those famous words: "That's one small step for [a] man, one giant leap for mankind"

Read more

Pages