The Two-Way
7:56 am
Tue September 4, 2012

Power's Still Out For Many After Isaac, And They're Boiling

Kids in New Orleans on Monday getting some relief from the heat thanks to ice being distributed to those without power.
Mario Tama Getty Images

Check this fresh headline from The Times-Picayune in New Orleans:

"Public's anger at lengthy power outage after Isaac boils over."

According to the newspaper, after six days of camping outside in sweltering temperatures because Hurricane Isaac knocked out power last week, there are many angry folks in the city and surrounding parishes.

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-Inside Pitch
7:51 am
Tue September 4, 2012

Cincinnati firefighter to address Democratic convention tonight

Cincinnati firefighter Doug Stern, who appeared in TV commercials last year urging voters to repeal Senate Bill 5, will speak at the first session of the Democratic National Convention in Charlotte tonight.


Stern, a member of Cincinnati Firefighters Local 48, will speak briefly sometime between 6 and 7 p.m. tonight.


His subject, no doubt, will be Senate Bill 5, the Republican-backed legislation which would have limited the collective bargaining powers of public employees such as police, firefighters and teachers.

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The Two-Way
7:23 am
Tue September 4, 2012

Are You Better Off? That's The Question As Democrats Gather

One of the many mementos for sale at the Democratic National Convention in Charlotte, N.C.
Win McNamee Getty Images
  • Mara Liasson on 'Morning Edition'

Are you better off than you were four years ago?

That classic question — so famously asked by then-candidate Ronald Reagan in 1980 — is again a topic of great debate as Democrats kick off their 2012 national convention in Charlotte, N.C.

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Book Reviews
7:03 am
Tue September 4, 2012

'Wilderness Of Error' Indicts U.S. Justice System

Army doctor Jeffrey McDonald, shown here in a 1995 photo, was convicted of murdering his pregnant wife and two daughters in the 1970s. He maintains that they were killed by a band of hippies.
Shane Young AP

On Feb. 17, 1970, physician Jeffrey MacDonald called the police to his Fort Bragg, N.C., home. He told the responding officers that he had been assaulted by a group of "hippie" intruders, who had also bludgeoned and stabbed his wife and two young daughters — ages 2 and 5 — to death. MacDonald suffered a concussion and collapsed lung but survived.

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Asia
6:23 am
Tue September 4, 2012

Generators Power Through India's Blackouts

Originally published on Tue September 4, 2012 5:30 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene. Good morning.

The blackout that recently disrupted electricity across northern India is said to have affected more people than any previous power outage ever. It covered an area that's home to some 670 million people; that would be roughly 10 percent of the world's population. Still, large numbers of Indians living in the blackout zone barely noticed it happened. From New Delhi, NPR's Julie McCarthy explains.

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Election 2012
5:40 am
Tue September 4, 2012

Mayor Castro, 1st Latino To Give DNC Keynote Speech

San Antonio Mayor Julian Castro (left) stands onstage with his twin, Joaquin, during preparations Monday for the Democratic National Convention in Charlotte, N.C. The mayor will give the keynote address Tuesday night, introduced by his brother, a Texas legislator.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Tue September 4, 2012 12:38 pm

Julian Castro, the 37-year-old mayor of San Antonio, Texas, has been called the new face of the Democratic Party. And on Tuesday night, he'll become the first Latino to deliver the keynote speech at the party's national convention.

Over the weekend, parishioners at St. Paul Catholic Church in San Antonio sent off one of their own with a breakfast taco rally.

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Highway work
4:00 am
Tue September 4, 2012

Work on Northbound 471 nearing completion

Credit Provided

There's good news for morning commuters who rely on northbound 471 to get to downtown Cincinnati. 

Most of the heavy construction to replace the pavement on the interstate has now been completed. 

But Kentucky Transportation Cabinet spokeswoman Nancy Wood said that doesn't mean the project is finished.

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The Salt
3:22 am
Tue September 4, 2012

Why Organic Food May Not Be Healthier For You

A shopper surveys the produce at Pacifica Farmers Market in Pacifica, Calif., in 2011.
AP

Originally published on Wed September 19, 2012 4:13 pm

Yes, organics is a $29 billion industry and still growing. Something is pulling us toward those organic veggies that are grown without synthetic pesticides or fertilizers.

But if you're thinking that organic produce will help you stay healthier, a new finding may come as a surprise. A new study published in the Annals of Internal Medicine finds scant evidence of health benefits from organic foods.

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Afghanistan
3:21 am
Tue September 4, 2012

Afghans Seek A Homegrown Plan For Security

An Afghan man inspects a motorcycle used in a suicide attack in a parking lot holding dozens of trucks supplying the NATO-run Kandahar Air Base in June. Bombings and assassinations are on the rise in Kandahar. Last month, a suicide bomber struck the convoy of the provincial police chief, Gen. Abdul Raziq, who was severely injured.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue September 4, 2012 12:38 pm

For years, Kandahar province has been a key focus of NATO's efforts to stabilize Afghanistan. The volatile region is the birthplace of the Taliban, and its capital is the country's second-largest city.

American troops have begun leaving this area by the thousands and are handing security responsibilities over to Afghan forces. Afghan officials claim things are getting better.

But many residents don't trust Western forces or their own government's claims, and they are now turning to a third party for help.

A Dangerous City

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Author Interviews
3:20 am
Tue September 4, 2012

'Children Succeed' With Character, Not Test Scores

Originally published on Tue September 4, 2012 12:38 pm

A child's success can't be measured in IQ scores, standardized tests or vocabulary quizzes, says author Paul Tough. Success, he argues, is about how young people build character. Tough explores this idea in his new book, How Children Succeed: Grit, Curiosity and the Hidden Power of Character.

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