The Two-Way
1:45 pm
Mon September 17, 2012

Makers Of the DipJar Hope That Dipping To Tip Catches On

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 6:46 am

As Americans increasingly rely on cards, not cash, to pay for small items like coffee and snacks, it's not always easy to tip the baristas and counter folks who make those transactions run smoothly. A new device called the "Dip Jar" might fix that, by allowing customers to dip a card to give $1 to the staff.

That might come as welcome news to workers behind the counter, who've seen debit and credit cards take over from cash. As a result, there's less change from which to pull a tip for the traditional jar that's often seen on counters where coffee, beer, or sandwiches are sold.

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The Two-Way
12:30 pm
Mon September 17, 2012

Chicago's Mayor Emanuel Asks Court To Order Teachers Back To School

Striking Chicago public school teachers outside of George Westinghouse College Prep high school earlier today.
Scott Olson Getty Images

Following through on what he said he would do if the city's teachers didn't end their week-old strike and return to their classrooms, Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel has asked a judge to intervene.

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The Two-Way
12:25 pm
Mon September 17, 2012

Astronauts Return From Space Station, As An American Takes Command

The Soyuz capsule lands with Commander Gennady Padalka of Russia, NASA Flight Engineer Joe Acaba and Russian Flight Engineer Sergei Revin aboard, near the town of Arkalyk, Kazakhstan. The capsule's final meter of descent is eased by braking engines.
Carla Cioffi NASA

U.S. astronaut Sunita Williams is now in command of the International Space Station, after receiving control of the facility this weekend. Three departing astronauts whose capsule left the station early Monday landed safely three and a half hours later.

For NPR's Newscast, Peter van Dyk filed this report from Moscow:

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Local News
12:00 pm
Mon September 17, 2012

Obama on his way to big crowd at Eden Park

President Obama's motorcade is on its way to Seasongood Pavilion at Cincinnati's Eden Park, where thousands of supporters have filled the hillside opposite the Cincinnati Art Museum, eagerly awaiting his arrival.

Excerpts of the president's speech make it clear that the president intends to tout his administration's action this morning to file a complaint with the World Trade Organization over what it considers unfair trade practices by China in the export of autos and auto parts.

Mitt Romney's campaign has already called the action "too little, too late."

Politics
11:34 am
Mon September 17, 2012

A Year On, What Did 'Occupy' Accomplish?

The Occupy Wall Street movement marks its first anniversary this week. Its supporters argue that it elevated the issue of economic inequality, but others say it made more noise than change. Host Michel Martin discusses the movement with author Debra Dickerson, who is still participating in protests and writes about them for Slate.com.

Economy
11:34 am
Mon September 17, 2012

Is The 'Fiscal Cliff' As Bad As It Sounds?

Originally published on Thu September 20, 2012 12:29 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Coming up, last year the Occupy Wall Street movement dominated headlines for weeks and added terms like the 99 percent to our political vocabularies. But a year after the protests started we wanted to know where the movement stands now. We're going to call writer and activist Debra Dickerson about this. She's at the heart of the anniversary protest. That's later in the program.

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Food
11:34 am
Mon September 17, 2012

Are You A Sellout If You Cook For Your Man?

Originally published on Mon September 17, 2012 12:03 pm

For generations women have been told, if you want a man, learn to cook. That's exactly why feminist writer Shayla Pierce stayed out of the kitchen. But now she finds herself with a boyfriend, learning to cook, and wondering if that makes her a sellout. She speaks with host Michel Martin about her article and her change of heart.

The Two-Way
11:33 am
Mon September 17, 2012

A Los Alamos Landmark, The 'Black Hole,' Is About To Disappear

"Atomic Ed" Grothus at the Black Hole surplus story in Los Alamos, N.M., in 2008.
John Burnett NPR

It's called the Black Hole because "everything goes in and nothing comes out," as founder Ed Grothus told NPR's John Burnett in 2008.

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The Salt
10:35 am
Mon September 17, 2012

U.S. Kids Eat Nearly As Much Salt As Adults, Putting Health At Risk

It's going to take a lot more than emptying the salt shaker to cut back on the sodium U.S. kids are getting.
L. Marie Flickr.com

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 2:42 pm

Yes, we love salt. It makes everything taste better. But as a society, we're eating way too much of it. And, so are our children.

A new study from researchers at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows that children in the U.S. between the ages of 8 and 18 are eating, on average, 3,387 mg per day. That's about the same amount as adults. But it's a lot more than the 2,300 mg daily limit recommended by the federal dietary guidelines.

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Politics
10:16 am
Mon September 17, 2012

Obama Launching China Trade Case

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 9:52 am

President Obama will launch a new trade enforcement case against China Monday, using the power of incumbency to counter Republican Mitt Romney's criticism that he is ceding American jobs to the Asian power.

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